Study Guides (248,159)
Canada (121,353)
Psychology (970)
Final

Comprehension.docx

6 Pages
96 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 3UU3
Professor
Karin R Humphreys
Semester
Winter

Description
March 19 , 2014 Psych 3UU3: Psychology of Language Comprehension Understanding Language ­ Text: need to understand entire texts ­ Discourse: between people ­ Conversations  Chapters Covered ­ This lecture covers material both from chapter 12 and from chapter 14 ­ We’ll come back to 14 in two weeks Relation between Language and Real World Knowledge ­ How does interact between language use and our real­world knowledge Cohesion ­ Local cohesion: make sense of stuff coming in in light of other stuff that has come  in ­ Global cohesion: make sense of stuff coming in in light of everything we know  about the world ­ Maintaining cohesion is important ­ Always trying to make sense of it and put it together with everything we know Types of Anaphoric Reference ­ Have an idea that we need to solve and that is easy don’t need to know specifics ­ We don’t say everything we mean, we need to figure out ­ Aaphroe: referring back to something else ­ Pronominal: conzuela is a remarkable athlete. She swims, runs and bikes  everyday ­ Demonstrative: that was the best spring break ever. ­ Comparative: he’s not as cleaver as I thought ­ Substitution: he ordered her to stand up. She did so ­ Ellipsis: he has a beautiful voice I don’t {have a beautiful voice} ­ Conjunction: I thought I could ski well but I couldn’t ­ Lexical: the child babbled in his crib. The little tyke made me laugh. ­ A stonemason and his apprentice set down a block of stone by the side of the  road. They were hungry. The stonemason had left their lunch under a nearby olive  tree. It was a hot day but fortunately the beer was still cold. There was a large  piece of nougat too, but when the apprentice tried to cut through it, the knife.  They decided to eat it later. After lunch, the stonemason picked up his tools, and  headed towards the tower. Another few weeks and it would be finished. ­ Legal documents get rid of the assumptions that are normal to make to make sure  that it is explicitly spelt out Given Vs. New Information ­ Helps the listener when you are forming coherence ­ The stonemason is introduced then you use his and you know that it is referring to  the stonemason: it must not be new information ­ Prenominalization: turning it into a pronoun, when it is given you use the pronoun  when it is new you introduce it ­ One of these sentences actually appeared in the story before Verbatim Memory ­ People’s verbatim memories are terrible ­ Exception, jokes, highly relational content ­ Ex.: Murphy & Shapiro (1994) • Is the flower shop too far for you • I never thought I’d become a mother this young • Sarcastic vs. bland conditions: bland condition don’t remember the exact  sentences but when it is sarcastic they have better memory of the exact  wording as it is highly interpersonal The Role of Context ­ CONTEXT IS REALLY IMPORTANT ­ Prior knowledge is crucial and has a huge influence on: • To how you understand • To how you remember ­ But can also lead you astray: schemas (expectations about how the world  normally works) Barlett’s War of the Ghosts (1932) ­ Cultural context to understand Bransford & Johnson (1972) ­ Laundry Inferences ­ All understanding is based on inferences ­ Jane heard the jingling of the ice cream truck. She ran to her piggy bank and  started to shake it. Finally some money came out? ­ How old is Jane ­ Why did she get the money ­ Did she turn her piggy bank upside down ­ Was the money coins or bills ­ Things that are conveyed but isn’t in the text itself ­ Going beyond the literal meaning of the text • Logical inferences • Pragmatic inferences  Bridging/backwards inferences: things you have to have to make  the text make sense, linking two things in the text  Elaborative/forward inferences: makes sense wihin the world,  don’t have to make them to cohere with itself but to cohere with  what you know about the world Logical Inferences ­ Bransford, Barclay and Franks: • When do we make inferences? How automatically? • Three turtles rested on a floating log and a fish swam beneath them • Three turtles rested on a floating log and a fish swam beneath it • Did the fish swim beneath them Inferences ­ When do we make them ­ Constructionist view: not made all the time, goal driven, need to know • Top down infleunces ­ Minimalist hypothesis: logical automatic, bridging inferences are automatic,  elaborative kept to a minimum (do not make them unless you have to) • Data driven, automatic ­ Are infereneces made at comprehension or recall: happening as we process ­ Asking questions is recall ­ Minimalist • What inferences are made and when?  Online processing = lexical decision task  The housewife was learning to be a seamstress and needed practice  so she got out the skirt she was making and threded her need  Lexical decision task to sew: activate somehow  The director and cameraman were ready to shoot close­ups when 
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 3UU3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit