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2C06 E - Outline - 28 January & 4 February.doc

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Department
Sociology
Course
SOCIOL 2C06
Professor
Denis Wall
Semester
Winter

Description
SOCI2C06E – Deviance 28 January & 4 February Subcultures and social learning (parts 1 and 2) Readings: - Deutschmann, chapter 9 - Adler & Adler, ch. 8: Sutherland and Cressey, “Differential Association” - Adler & Adler, ch. 26: Scully and Marolla, “Convicted Rapists’ Vocabulary of Motive” - Adler & Adler, ch. 27: Cromwell and Thurman, “The Devil Made Me Do It: Use of Neutralizations by Shoplifters” - Adler & Adler, ch. 33: Adler and Adler, “Cyber Communities of Self-Injury” - Adler & Adler, ch. 34: Jenkot, “Cooks are like Gods: Hierarchies in Methamphetamine- Producing Groups” - Adler & Adler, ch. 35: Miller, “Gender and Victimization Risk Among Young Women in Gangs” “Learning would be exceedingly laborious, not to mention hazardous, if people had to rely solely on the effects of their own actions to inform them what to do. Fortunately, most human behavior is learned observationally through modeling: from observing others one forms an idea of how new behaviors are performed, and on later occasions this coded information serves as a guide for action.” (Albert Bandura, 1977) Subcultures: sharing of norms and values that deviate from conventional culture Basic features of subcultures (Deutschmann) - specialized jargon / argot - vocabularies of motive: - neutralizations or justifications - distinctive clothing and body language: - signifies membership - beliefs and norms: - sometimes opposed to the mainstream - mutually supporting networks: - repeated interaction with others in a subculture 1 Reading: Adler & Adler, ch. 33: Adler and Adler, “Cyber Communities of Self-Injury” Example of Youth subcultures - specialized jargon / argot: - vocabularies of motive: - distinctive clothing and body language: - beliefs and norms: - mutually supporting networks: Reading: Adler & Adler, ch. 34: Jenkot, “Cooks are like Gods: Hierarchies in Methamphetamine-Producing Groups” Example of “occupational subcultures” - mutually supporting networks - beliefs and norms that diverge or differ from the mainstream Reading: Adler & Adler, ch. 35: Miller, “Gender and Victimization Risk Among Young Women in Gangs” Example of “lower-class gang subcultures” - vocabularies of motive 2 Reading: Adler & Adler, ch. 8: Sutherland and Cressey, “Differential Association” --the transmission of culture (learning theories / cultural transmission theories) - learning includes: - techniques for committing the crime - specific direction of motives, drives, rationalizations, justifications, and attitudes - Sutherland’s nine propositions of differential association i.- criminal behavior is learned ii.- criminal behavior is learned in interaction with other persons in a process of communication iii.- the principal part of the learning of criminal behavior occurs within intimate personal groups (subcultures) iv.- when criminal behavior is learned, the learning includes a.- techniques of committing the crime. . . b.- the specific direction of motives, drives, rationalizations, and attitudes v.- the specific direction of motives and drives is learned from definitions of legal codes as favorable and unfavorable *vi.- person becomes delinquent because of an excess of definitions favorable to violation of law over definitions unfavorable to violation of law vii.- differential associations may vary in frequency, duration, priority, and intensity viii.- the process of learning criminal behavior by association with criminal and anti criminal patterns involves all of the mechanisms that are involved in any other
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