Study Guides (256,446)
CA (124,649)
McMaster (7,720)
SOCIOL (308)
Final

2q06 final study pt1.docx

3 Pages
127 Views

Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOCIOL 2Q06
Professor
Sarah Clancy

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 3 pages of the document.
Jan. 7 Work
Nelson Chapter 6 – Work p. 218-244
The Work-Role Model
three principles of male work-role model
o1. Men are to work in paid employment from graduation until retirement or
death; only then have they permission to cease laboring for pay
o2. A man is to make his job the central focus of his adult life and to subordinate
all other roles to it.
o3. The language of the human-potential movement (you are what you do)
self-actualization – the max if one’s human potential
co-breadwinners – contributing to family income to the same degree as their husband
employed homemakers – viewed their husbands’ jobs as more important than their own,
which they regarded as furnishing money for “extras”
helpers
supplementary providers – performing an important provide function, but defined their
husbands as primary provider and considered his job more important than their own
reluctant providers – despite their feeling that the provider role should not be based on
gender, were rarely employed full-time and put their income towards “extras.”
family-centred workers – believed providers should be male and reserved the right to
quit their jobs if needed at home
committed workers – who derived enormous non-material satisfaction from being in the
labour force, were committed to particular jobs and found that their families relied on the
income they brought in
Paid Work
labour force participation rates – attributable to a combination of factors: changing
opportunities in Canada’s occupation structure, inflationary pressures necessitating higher
family incomes, and changing gender expectations and beliefs about employment,
marriage, parenthood, and parenting
Occupational Distributions and Segregations
occupational sex segregation – the concentration of women within certain occupations
and men in others
prestige penalty
ladderclimbers
troublemakers
tokenism – visibility, polarization, stereotyping
glass escalator – the motor that drives the glass escalator is gender, the stereotype that
because someone is male he is more capable
glass ceiling – an invisible socially created barrier that prevents women (and other
minorities) from moving into the highest echelons of the workplaces. The higher the
position, the more glaring the gender gap.
Multiple Jeopardies
intersectionality
what are the multiple jeopardies

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
Jan 7 WorkNelson Chapter 6Work p 218244The WorkRole Modelthree principles of male workrole modelo1 Men are to work in paid employment from graduation until retirement or death only then have they permission to cease laboring for payo2 A man is to make his job the central focus of his adult life and to subordinate all other roles to ito3 The language of the humanpotential movement you are what you doselfactualizationthe max if ones human potential cobreadwinnerscontributing to family income to the same degree as their husbandemployed homemakersviewed their husbands jobs as more important than their own which they regarded as furnishing money for extrashelperssupplementary providersperforming an important provide function but defined their husbands as primary provider and considered his job more important than their ownreluctant providersdespite their feeling that the provider role should not be based on gender were rarely employed fulltime and put their income towards extrasfamilycentred workersbelieved providers should be male and reserved the right to quit their jobs if needed at homeco
More Less
Unlock Document


Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit