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SOCPSY 1Z03 Study Guide - Midterm Guide: George Herbert Mead, Social Identity Theory, Symbolic InteractionismPremium

7 pages41 viewsWinter 2018

Department
Social Psychology
Course Code
SOCPSY 1Z03
Professor
Erica Speakman
Study Guide
Midterm

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General Study Guide for 1Z03 Midterm
Week 2 Introduction to Social Psychology
- Definition of social psychology: the merging of two studies (turn on 20th century).
Interest of psychology (emphasis on the individual) and sociology (emphasis on social
structure). The systemic study of nature and causes of human social behaviour, study of
thoughts, feelings, attitudes are shaped by the actual or imagines presence of others, what
people do and why they do it
- Core concerns of social psychology:
o The impact one individual has on another:
Purposeful or not, either explicitly (physically changing something they do
or the way they think) or implicitly (without realising changes the way you
think of yourself)
o The impact a group has on its members
Rules & norms (informal rules a group has that establish your behaviour).
i.e. being in a catholic group means no sex before marriage, breaking these
rules/norms makes group members uncomfortable
o The impact that members have on groups they belong to
See be seen during large scale events, LGBTQ individual, leadership in a
group
o The impact a group has on another group
Intergroup conflict and the influence they have on one another (pro-trump
vs anti-trump)
o The impact of social context and social structure on groups and individuals
Impact that society has on you, and what impact you have on society.
When your favourite song comes on, where you are will dictate if you will
sing or not, would you come to class drunk?
- Predominant theoretical perspectives what they are and what are their limitations
o Symbolic Interactionism
Developed by Charles Horton Cooley and George Herbert Mead
Termed by Blumer, a student of Cooley
Understand the world as the product of everyday interactions of people
People will act towards things based on the meaning they have for them,
the meanings are derived through social interaction and NOT inherent.
Meanings can be modified through social interaction, norms are changed
over time, meanings are changing all the time
- Looking Glass Self (Cooley)
o How we perceive how others perceive us
o Three elements:
Imagine How we appear to others
Imagine the other persons reaction to our appearance
Respond with some sort of feeling
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o Group Processes
2 or more people, dependent on one another, rules & norms & power
structures
Social Exchange Theory:
Formation & sustainability, termination of relations
Cost-benefit ideology (reward system, do the rewards outweigh the
costs)
Subjective (tangible)
- Social Status: the position that one holds in a society or group
o Social Structure and Personality
Social Structure: relationships between groups of individual, things that
impact your personality
Impacts the individual
Social Institutions: family, school mass media, religion, social class
o Cognitive Perspectives
Intervening factor of external stimuli and behavioural responses
Mental activities act as determinates of social behaviour
Social Identity Theory: we take on a number of roles, found by
Tajfel and Turner in the 70’s and 80’s, social structures guide our
cognitive processes
Must identify with a group, must have impact on you to give sense
of self-esteem or pride
o Evolutionary Theory
Darwin’s theory of evolution
Social behaviour linked to genes
Week 3 Research Methods
- Empirical research: investigation of observable phenomena, relies on observable and
measurable data, derives knowledge from actual experience rather than theory or belief
- Validity of finding: what was found isn’t always going to be correct
o Internal: the confidence we have in our findings, no extraneous variables
o External: findings are generalizable (applicable to all people)
- Variables
o Independent, Dependant, Extraneous
- Hypothesis and Hypothesis testing: a testable question to answer
- Different research methods be familiar with their strengths and weaknesses
o Surveys
Relies on self-reporting, might not capture whole picture
S: generally inexpensive, potentially clear picture of the phenomena under
study
W: problems w self-reporting, might not have enough options for the
response someone wants to give
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