DEVS 100 Study Guide - Final Guide: Multilateralism, Hard Power, The Exception

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Published on 15 Apr 2013
School
Queen's University
Department
Global Development Studies
Course
DEVS 100
Professor
DEVS100 - Final Exam
Second Semester Lectures Notes
Blue = Important discourses/concepts
Red = Important people
WEEK 6 - Canadian Foreign Policy
Unilateralism: Each country does whatever it can do to get whatever it can get - the most
powerful and evil wins (via hard power: coercion)
Multilateralism: All countries involved work together to solve problems and allocate resources
(via. soft power: moral suasion using symbolic means and non-coercive actions)
Keating on Canadian Multilateralism
-“multilateralism is a good idea”
-multilateralism has been persistently prominent in the conduct of post war Canadian foreign
policy
-it has been effective (morally as well)
-it has made constructive contributions to world order
-during the 1940s and 1950s, Canada resisted efforts to turn the UN into an institution that
would promote Western values
-Canadian government has supported international and regional institutions in assuming
increased responsibility for the security and welfare of individuals in various parts of the world
-international consultation and co-operation
-guarantees Canadians a voice
-this order serves Canada’s interests
-idea of middle powers
-at the core of multilateralism is the idea that nation states should talk with each other about
what is happening in the world
-citizens have rights that must be upheld (ex. rights to security)
-if countries aren’t working well together there has to be a higher power to make the cooperate
-location of sovereignty
What Drives New Interventionism?
1. Exceptionalism
-formerly associated with extreme, unusual circumstances, the exception was invoked by a law,
like Canada’s Emergency Management Act, or entered in into via a ‘declaration of war
-civil rights suspended, state, police and military power amplified
-supposed to be temporary
-now, the exception is the norm, both within and between states, supported by a thin or no-
existent veil of ‘legality’ and usually without a ‘declaration of war
2. Pre-Emptive Action
-now people are being killed, countries are being invaded, all on the assumption that they may
do something that the state doesn’t like in the future
-this violates old ideas like state sovereignty and personal liberty and habeas corpus, but it
happens all the time (Ex. in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, Toronto G20 etc.)
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Document Summary

Unilateralism: each country does whatever it can do to get whatever it can get - the most powerful and evil wins (via hard power: coercion) Multilateralism: all countries involved work together to solve problems and allocate resources (via. soft power: moral suasion using symbolic means and non-coercive actions) Multilateralism has been persistently prominent in the conduct of post war canadian foreign policy. It has been effective (morally as well) It has made constructive contributions to world order. During the 1940s and 1950s, canada resisted efforts to turn the un into an institution that would promote western values. Canadian government has supported international and regional institutions in assuming increased responsibility for the security and welfare of individuals in various parts of the world. At the core of multilateralism is the idea that nation states should talk with each other about what is happening in the world. Citizens have rights that must be upheld (ex. rights to security)

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