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HLTH 101- Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 27 pages long!)


Department
Health Studies
Course Code
HLTH 101
Professor
Jennifer Wigglesworth
Study Guide
Final

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Queen's
HLTH 101
Final EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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HLTH 101 Week 1 Notes
What are Social Determinants of Health?
- Conditions in which people are born, grow, work, live and age, and the wider set of forces and
systems (economic policies and systems, social norms, social policies and political systems, which
affect the distribution of money, power and resources at global, national and local levels).
- The social determinants of health are mostly responsible for health inequities - the unfair and
avoidable differences in health status seen within and between countries.
- soial deteriats of health are the upstrea fators affetig our health ad ho log e lie.
When we address the social determinants of health, we treat the source or underlying causes of
poor health, not just the symptoms.
- Social determinants of health include consideration of social, political, and economic forces and
systems that impact the conditions in which people live and work.
- The social determinants of health set up the conditions of everyday life in which different groups of
people have different opportunities to enjoy health. This affects the average health and longevity of
these groups of people.
- Lists of the social determinants of health invariably include income, education, housing,
employment, gender, racism, and childhood development, food, neighbourhoods, transportation,
access to health care and social support.
- Some people who study social determinants of health focus on those who are most marginalized or
excluded from the mainstream, and thus have the worst health. The most marginalized suffer most
than others from unjust social arrangements. These include people living in poverty, homeless
people, and racialized minorities.
- the social determinants of health often intersect, such that racialized minorities (e.g.: Black people,
are more likely to be poor, food insecure, poorly housed and less likely to get higher education)
- Some are interested in the range and distribution of the social determinants, and the gap between
the healthiest and the least healthy (the distribution of income, and the corresponding distribution
of health, from the poorest to the richest). Evidence suggests the bigger the gap, the worse
eeryoe’s health is.
- There is a split in the social determinants world about whether to focus on material social
determinants of health, such as income and housing, or psychosocial determinants of health, such
as social support and the organization of status hierarchies
- How are social determinants of health different and determinants of health different? There are 3
main types of determinants of health: genetic and biological determinants, individual (lifestyle)
determinants and social determinants.
- Total of 12 determinants. Alan Davidson does not consider biology & genetic endowment or health
services in the textbook because these are not social determinants of health. In saying this he
implies that #7, personal health practices and coping skills, is a social determinant of health. But
these are PERSONAL or individual determinants of health, not social determinants of health
- For the purposes of this course, individual behaviours/personal health practices and coping skills,
are NOT social determinants of health.
What is Public Health?
- term public health refers to the puli’s health or the health of the puli.
- points to the longevity of the population and the extent to which the population is healthy and free
from disease.
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- public health and population health used interchangeably.
- puli health is used to refer to hat e do as a soiety olletiely to assure the conditions in
which people can be healthy Istitute of Mediie.
- main goal of public health: prevent illness and accidents, and the premature deaths that may result.
- Concern: to ensure safe drinking water. Major efforts in cities and towns to set up sewage systems
and water treatment plants to ensure safe drinking water.
- Public health is responsible for the safety of our food system, with regulations, procedures and
inspections designed to prevent the contamination of food like milk and meat. Also regulations that
prohibit the adulteration of food for economic gain, such as adding chalk to wheat flour
- Public health can order people to be quarantined, stay home from school if vaccines not updated,
- In public health, the improved health and lives saved are statistical. The benefit is to the population,
not to individuals. For example, we know that deaths from automobile accidents have decreased
about 17% because of the introduction of mandatory seat belt laws in the 1970s and 1980s.
Hoeer, e a’t eessarily identify specific people whose lives have been saved.
- ay state: the idea that government is overprotective and interfering with individual liberty or
freedom.
- three primary philosophical and political questions for public health
Number one: what is the problem that needs to be addressed? What is the most effective
way to reduce risk?
Nuer to: ho is resposile for takig atio to protet the puli’s health? Is it
individuals? Corporations? Government?
Number three: how safe should we seek to make the public from hazards? What level of risk
are we willing to accept?
What is Ideology?
- Ideology is a relatively coherent system of values, beliefs, or ideas shared by a social group and
usually take for grated as atural or iheretly true.
- gives us a framework for understanding and making sense of the world, and orients us to particular
solutions to problems in the world.
- 3 ideologies that Rob Baggott lays out:
collectivist and socialist
dominant in Canada and in European countries after the Second World War, when many
countries developed what is called the welfare state or comprehensive government services
to support human well-being or welfare (includes expanding access to post-secondary
education, systems of income support, and universal health care)
government, or the state, is seen as the principle means of social improvement
state regulates businesses and corporations to reduce the harms that can result from the
drive for profit (labour laws)
positive freedom: freedom to fully participate in what is normal in any society, including
political life.
Key words: egalitarianism, equality, equity, humanitarianism, social justice, social
responsibility, the collective good, the common good, interdependence, interconnection,
mutual obligation, community and compassion
liberal individualist/neoliberalism
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