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KNPE 255- Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 36 pages long!)Premium

36 pages144 viewsSpring 2018

Department
Kinesiology
Course Code
KNPE 255
Professor
Robert Ross
Study Guide
Final

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Queen's
KNPE 255
Final EXAM
STUDY GUIDE
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Week 2 Lecture 3: Robert Ross et al.
Importance of Assessing Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Clinical Practice BOB ROSS
- Low levels of CRF associated with high risk of CVD, all-cause mortality, and mortality rates for
certain cancers
- CRF may be stronger predictor of mortality than smoking, hypertension, high cholesterol, and
T2D but not currently included in risk assessments
- Addition of CRF improves reclassification of risk for adverse outcomes
- CRF: ability to transport O2 to mito to perform physical work so it is functional capacity of
person and Reflects body health
o Half of variance in CRF due to heritable factors and their contribution to response of CRF
to PA is also half
o Measured directly with VO2 max or VO2 peak
- Age adjusted all-cause death rate decreases from low to moderate to high CRF in both sexes
Overview of CRF and Health Outcomes:
- CRF strong and independent marker of risk for CVD and All-cause mortality
- CRF stronger predictor of risk than other exercise test variables
- Each 1-MET higher CRF associated with sig. improvement in survival
- Strength of exercise capacity in predicting risk of mortality greater in F than M
Association BW CRF and Health Outcomes:
- Association bw CRF and health outcomes addressed in multiple populations
- Largest gains in survival noted when comparing lowest to next lowest CRF groups (health
benefits most noticeable at low end of CRF continuum)
- CRF has strong inverse association with incidence of all-cause mortality with lesser
improvements in health outcomes from moderate to high fitness groups
- High CRF levels not required to have sig. health benefits (< 5 METS = high risk) (>8-10 METS has
health protection)
- CRF can be used as preoperative predictor of surgical risk may because fitter patients can cope
with aerobic and myocardial demands caused by surgery
- Higher midlife CRF associated with lower risk of HF hospitalization in later life
- Strong inverse dose-response association between time spent walking and risk of stroke
independent of intensity and established/novel risk factors
Reclassification of CV Risk:
- Net reclassification improvement (NRI): indicates whether addition of biomarker correctly and
significantly alters risk classification (net change in risk bw those who do and do not experience
the event)
- Addition of CRF to risk scores improves risk predication and reclassification of risk for adverse
health outcomes beyond traditional scores
o Not included though because lack of evidence from RCTs
- Serial measures of CRF help with risk stratification because people whose CRF increases
between exams have lower risk than those whose CRF decreases
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Week 2 Lecture 3: Robert Ross et al.
- Higher levels of CRF associated with reduced adverse health outcomes and chronic diseases in
additio to CVD (Deetia, Alzheier’s, Psyhologial stress, prediaetes, T2DM, ad Metabolic
Syndrome)
- Higher CRF also associated with lower risk of developing lung, breast and gastrointestinal
cancers and prevents disability later in life
- PA interventions targeting least fit individuals will have largest health benefit
Recommendations:
- Type: involve major muscle groups in continuous and rhythmic exercise
- Intensity: moderate and vigorous relative to capacity for healthy adults but light and moderate
for older and deconditioned adults
- Frequency: >5days of moderate, > 3 days of vigorous or combo for 3-5 days
- Time: 30-60 min of moderate and 20-60 min of vigorous per day of exercise but even >10 min is
good for inactive people
- Amount: 500-1000 METS-min/week recommended
- Pattern: one continuous sessions per day or multiple sessions per day greater than 10 mins
- Progression: increase volume by adjusting duration, frequency or intensity
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