Study Guides (248,228)
Canada (121,418)
Psychology (587)
PSYC 100 (274)
Prof. (40)

Week 13 PSYCH online reading.docx

4 Pages
85 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 100
Professor
Prof.
Semester
Fall

Description
PSYCH – Week 13 Online Readings Week 13: Language Focus Question: Why are humans better than computers at interpreting both spoken and written language? Communicating Information Language is a method for communicating information, including ideas, thoughts,  and emotions. Semantivity: The extent to which a language can use symbols to transmit meaningful  messages. Generativity and Displacement Language combines a limited number of words and a few rules to convey many  ideas, called generativity. To be considered ‘language’ in the strictest sense, a form of  communication must have the property of generativity and displacement, the ability to  convey a message that is not tied to the current time and place. So language must be able  to communicate information about events in the past or future or at some other location. An Operational Definition of Language “Language can be defined as a socially agreed­upon, rule­governed system of  arbitrary symbols that can be combined in different ways to communicate ideas and  feelings about both the present time and lace and other times and places, real or  imagined.” Linguistics               Linguists study the ‘rules’ of language, whereas psycholinguists study verbal  behaviour and cognition. Psycholinguistics: A branch of cognitive psychology devoted to  the study of the acquisition, comprehension, and production of language. Phonology: The rules that govern the patterns of sounds that are used in a language ­  which sounds are used, and how they're combined Phonemes: The basic distinctive speech sounds in a language that distinguish one word  (e.g., rice) from another (lice). Different languages use different phonemes. Phonemes are combined to form morphemes, the smallest meaningful units in a  language. There are two types of morphemes. Free morphemes are meaningful on their own  and can stand alone as words. Bound morphemes are meaningful only when combined  with other morphemes to form words. For instance, the word "engagement" contains the  free morpheme "engage" as well as the bound morpheme "­ment". You can think of  morphemes as the "Lego bricks" we use to build words. In English, the "s" ending on  plurals is a bound morpheme, as is the "­ed" ending on a past­tense verb. These can be  combined with free morphemes to make the words we need. Semantics, Syntax, and Pragmatics Semantics: The relationship between words and their meanings. Crucial for  comprehension.  Syntax or syntactical rules: Grammatical rules of a particular language for combining  words to form phrases, clauses, and sentences. Pragmatics: The social rules of language that allow people to use language appropriately  for different purposes and in different situations. Pragmatics helps you to interpret what  others say to you. There are different levels of language processing: 1. Recognize the sounds (phonemes) in the utterance. 2. Identify the words in the message and associate them with their meanings. To  complete this step, the listener must access his or her morphological and semantic  knowledge. 3. Analyse the syntax of the message. This is a complex process that can involve the  use of many different cues, including word order, word class, function and content  words, affixes (a type of bound morpheme), semantics, and prosody (see pp. 299­ 300 in your text). 4. Interpret the utterance in its context. This requires the ability to integrate  knowledge about the world (pragmatics) with the syntax and semantics of the  utterance. Making Sound Articulators: Mouth structures that make speech sounds (jaw,  tongue, lips, and soft palate). Coarticulation: Speech sounds for words are not produced in a  discrete sequence. Instead, the articulators are effectively shaping  multiple sounds at any moment in time, so that different  instances of a particular phoneme (e.g., "b") are acoustically  different, depending on the sounds preceding and following  them. Speech Perception and Infants Studies of speech perception in infants in different cultures have shown that when  infants are very young, they can tell the difference between all of the phonemes used in  the world's languages. However, by about one year of age, they have lost the ability to tell  the difference between sounds that aren‘t phonemic in the language they are being raised  in. Six­month­old Japanese children can tell the difference between the ‘r’ and ‘l’ used in  North American English, although their parents cannot. By 12 months, Japanese children  can no longer do this. This is because the brain has discarded this ‘unneeded’  information. Categorization and Grouping Categorical perception: The tendency of perceivers to disregard physical differences  between stimuli and perceive them as the same, such th
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 100

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit