Study Guides (248,252)
Canada (121,434)
Sociology (272)
SOCY 211 (15)
Quiz

SOCY 211 Test.docx
Premium

6 Pages
87 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOCY 211
Professor
Jones Adeji
Semester
Winter

Description
SOCY 211 Test #3 Review Chapter 11: • Statistical significance ensures tests aren’t a result of mere chance • Test of Significance: detect non random relationship • Measures of Association: provide information about the strength and direction of  relationships, trace causal relationships among variables, cannot prove two  variables are causally related  ▯association is not proof that a causal relation exists 11.2  • Variables can be said to be associated if the distribution of one of them changes  under the various categories or scores of the other • Independent Variable = X = Column • Dependent Variable = Y = Row • Assesing table from column to column we can observe the effects of the  independent variable on the dependent variable – Within Column Frequencies =  Conditional distributions of Y; they display the distribution of scores on the  dependent variable for each condition of the independent variable  • Chi Square (typically used for test of significance), any non­zero variable  obtained for chi square indicates association – If Chi square is zero, the variables  are independent and not associated   • Possible for two variables to be associated (by a non zero Chi Square) but still be  independent (fail to reject null hypothesis) 11.3 Three Characteristics of Bivariate Association 1) Does an association exist?  2) If an association exists, how strong is it? 3) What is the pattern or the direction of association?  1)  • Look at Y column changes or chi square • Compute percentages within the columns – down each column and then compare  horizontally   “Percentage down, compare across”  2)  • An issue of determining the amount of change in the conditional distributions of  Y   • Perfect relationship is strong evidence there is a causal relationship between  variables  • Measures of association provide precise, objective indicators of strength • 0.0 no association 1.00 perfect relationship  • Maximum difference:  compute column percentage, skim across each row to find  the largest difference between column percentages  • Magnitude of chi square bears no strength on association 3)  • Max Diff between 0 – 10% strength of relationship is weak • Max difference between 11­30% moderate • Max difference  more than 30% ­strong • Ordinal can be described in terms of direction as well • Positive association: high scores of one variable is associated with high scores of  another variable  ▯one variable increases in value, the other increases • Negative Association: high scores of one variable associated with low scores of  another variable, one variable decreases the other increases • Measures of association take on positive values for position associations and  negative values for negative associations  11.5  • Calculate column percentages, to asses strength use PHI – measure of association  for 2 x 2 tables  • Phi – closer to 1, the stronger the relationship  • Cramers V; Tables larger than 2x2  • Find the lesser of the number of rows minus 1 or the number of columns minus 1 • Interpreting: value of statistic and the strength of the relationship for phi and  cramers v  • Same strength difference as max difference  11.6  • PRE: developed to complement the older chi square measures of association,  however provides a more meaningful interpretation • Makes two different predications about the score of cases – first, ignore  information about the independent variable, therefore make many errors in  predicting the score of the dependent variable. Second,  take account of the score  of the case of the independent variable to help predict the score on the dependent  variable  • If there is an association between the variables, we will make fewer errors when  the independent variable is taken into account • Perfect association – make no errors when predicting Y from the form of X • Using information about the independent variable will reduce the number of  errors Lambda • A PRE measure • First, number of prediction errors made while ignoring the independent  variable (gender) must be found. Then, we will find the number of prediction  errors made while taking gender into account – sum of these two will then be  compared to derive the statistic  • First independent variable is ignored (gender) work only with row marginal –  E1 = the total number of cases minus the largest row total  • E2 = the sum of the following: for each column, the column total minus the  largest cell frequency • Lambda ranges from 0.0 to 1.0 • An index of the extent to which the independent variable (X) helps us to  predict or understand the dependent variable (y)  • Limitations of Lambda   ▯Lambda is asymmetric  ­ the value of the statistic will vary depending on  which variable is taken as dependent   ▯When one of the row totals is much larger than others, it can be misleading,  it can be 0.0 even when other measures show association, chi is then preferred  Chapter 12: Association Between Variables at the Ordinal Level • Collapsed ordinal variable – has a few, no more than 5 values or scores and can be  created by either collecting data in collapsed form of by collapsing it on a  continuous scale • Continuous Ordinal level variables = Spearmans rho  12.2  • Gamma, Kendal A and C, and Somers D  ▯measure strength and direction of  association by comparing each respondent to every other respondent, called a pair  of respondents, in terms of their ranking on independent or dependent variables  • Total number of unique pairs can be found when  n(n­1)/2 • Pairs can be divided into subgroups.  • A pair is “similar” when the larger value on the independent variable also has a  large value on the dependent variable • A pair is “dissimilar” when if the respondent with the large value on the  independent variable is small 
More Less

Related notes for SOCY 211

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit