Study Guides (248,368)
Canada (121,499)
Sociology (272)
SOCY 225 (5)
Quiz

Lectures Week 1- 4B Review for Quiz 1
Premium

12 Pages
86 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOCY 225
Professor
Richard Day
Semester
Winter

Description
SOCY 225 – WEEK 1A Who am I? • Not neutral, not objective • Someone with particular beliefs and commitments  • Striving to be ‘an autonomy­oriented practitioner and theorist’  • What does this mean? Practitioner: one who does things, has instrumental skills and knowledge Theorist: one who thinks about what can be done, what has been done, has intellectual  skills and knowledge Autonomy­oriented: (1) Taking (relative) autonomy from the dominant order (2)  Respecting the (relative) autonomy of others who share the value of autonomy. • Work on settler­indigenous solidarity, unsettling and decolonizing • An essential part of that involves creating alternatives to the currently dominant  order • I am interested in intentional communities as well • Born working class and anti­authoritarian. Still culturally that way, but enjoy  some elements of semi­bourgeois privilege (ability to go into debt). How to Succeed ­ becoming aware of your own values and beliefs – of who and how you are, and  how you have become that way. ­ being able to identify the discourses you are invoking when you make statements ­ Making arguments that are internally consistent and empirically coherent. • Nihilism: not believing in anything Week 1B: Becoming Analytical  The Illusion of Reality  00:00 – 05:53 • observer ‘creates’ ‘reality’ (for themself) • what we think of as ‘nothing’ is really quite a lot … everything, in fact, as  everything emerges out of this nothing • “creating a big bang is no problem” (they come out of black holes) • there is a level of “pure abstract potential, pure abstract, self­aware  consciousness” .. this is the position of the analyst   07:36­08:27 • “we are running a holodeck” • “most people don’t affect reality because they don’t believe they can”   Reality VS. the real  • reality = a ‘social construction’; intersubjective (cultural) • the real = what emerges out of the nothingness, if anything does, whether or not  there are any humans around • strong claim, made by some in this video: individual humans can have discernible  effects on the real, that others would discern. • weaker claim, that i’ll support more readily: individual humans can challenge ­  and partially overcome ­ their cultural conditioning, and therefore can condition  reality • analytic gambit: hopefully, as we become more self­conscious (aware), it becomes  possible – perhaps unavoidable – that we experience ‘reality’  differently from others. K PAX 02:20 – 05:17 • Outsiders know each other, try to help each other • State form intervenes, separates, atomizes   08:08­14:21  • Dominant order tries to ‘understand’ K­PAX … this is the job of the psychiatrist. • But Prot has no ‘symptoms’ of pathology, other than that he is clearly …  different…   22:50 – 26:50 • According to SCIENCE(!), Prot actually SEES differently – he comes from a  world that some of us might think of as Utopian. • To understand Prot, the psychiatrist must enter into Prot’s world, must put himself  ‘in the dark’, i.e. into what appears to him – and the CDO – as ignorance,  danger… So whats the point?  • living outside the CDO – even just partially, even if just in your own head ­ can  be quite difficult ... one loses friends, lovers, jobs... • most people know that intuitively, therefore stick with the herd • on the upside, if you head for the fence, you’ll be able to make more choices for  yourself, make new friends, and even ... Sociology of Globalization Week 2 Marx on Ideology Critique  • “All science would be superfluous is the outward appearance and the essence of  things coincided” • Ideology presents a false picture of the truth which only science can unmask Foucault on Discourse Analysis  • linked systems of subjects, objects, signifiers, and patterns of regularity •  relations of power are ubiquitous (help, hinder, ignore) •  out of these systems, truths emerge (they are not hidden) •  there are many of them (not just one) •  there is always resistance and contestation •  therefore no one can claim to know ‘the truth’ as such Nietzsche on Perspectivism  • “...[T]o see differently ... for once, to want to see differently, is no small discipline  and preparation for [the subject’s] future "objectivity" ­­ the latter understood not  as "contemplation without interest" (which is a nonsensical absurdity), but as the  ability to control one's Pro and Con and to dispose of them, so that one knows  how to employ a variety of perspectives and affective interpretations in the  service of knowledge.” RD in Perspectivism  • The perspectival analyst willingly, knowingly, and temporarily takes on positions  within various discourses, in order to know them. • The analyst does not become nothing (no subject, = objective), but becomes   multiple This interpreter is striving to take a position, i.e. to be critical, to reflect upon… • Their own values, history, affects, and (cs/ucs) paradigms • The values, history, affects, and paradigms of other interpreters • Evidence for the existence of objects and events in realities Stating an opinion vs. taking an opinion  • Opinion: unconscious, not necessarily informed, cannot be refuted, personal  • Position: self aware, necessarily informed, defensible, relational  • Be reflexive  Foucoult on Genealogical Analysis (How discourses change)  • Discursive Regime A: European penality dying  ▯(events – monarchy,  republicanism, rise of humanism)  ▯Discursive regime Jail  RD on one rather widespread way to do work in critical progressive social sciences  • track the current state of things (discourse analysis) • try to figure out how things got this way (genealogical analysis) • and where they might be headed (futurism) • so we can help to make things better (according to our own values)  Modes of Critique  • Opinion: doesn’t know it is one, not necessarily informed, cannot be refuted,  personal • Position: self­aware, striving to know what’s relevant, expects attempts at  refutation, relation (From the perspective of…) A Level of Complexity ­‘L’ is a system, i.e. a structured (resilient over time) set of processes (changes) ­‘L’ is an open system (there is communication across its boundaries) ­Communication = matter­energy  ­Structure comes from fields and fundamental constatnts (c=speed of light;  G=gravitational constant) ­Change arises as particles interact within fields A Dependent Hierarchy ­Communication occurs between levels of complexity ­‘M’ is of greater complexity than ‘L’ ­‘M’ is dependent upon ‘L’ (extinction rule) …if L doesn’t exist neither can M, but L can  exist without M because L is the base for M Particular Human Being Human species and soceities DNA/RNA Earth Solar System G (milky way) U ­One cannot exist with the one it is atop ­Interactions amongst a soup of particles within fields over time five is to ordered lumps  of stuff ­Who (besides gods?) could have predicted this? ­We say: G (system of galaxies) emerges out of U Foucault on Genealogical Analysis We… ­Track the current state of things ­Try to figure out how things got this way ­And where they might be headed Analysis and Social Change  (in the ‘Global North’ today) Mode of Analysis Associated mode of change Official Apathy Official Reform Oppositional Resistance Oppositional Revolution Outsider Creation of alternatives Modes of Critique ­Immanent critique: accepts the terms of the discourse out of which the argument arises,  and uses them to refute the argument. Ex: “When the Harper Government™ applauds the  role of women in the armed forces, this conflicts with Conservative ideals of women  being of greatest value in the home, caring for children and husbands.” ­External critique: rejects/ignores the terms of the discourse out of which the argument  arises, and comes at the issue from its own perspective ­ little discussion/ refutation is possible, these discourses are relatively incommensurable  ­Empirical critique: attempts to refute a claim of ‘fact’ upon which the argument relies,  or which it would find hard to accommodate given its logic. ­The analyst is assuming that the discourses are commensurable inasmuc
More Less

Related notes for SOCY 225

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit