Study Guides (248,404)
Canada (121,536)
Accounting (369)
ACC 821 (7)
Midterm

Midterm Review.docx

8 Pages
343 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Accounting
Course
ACC 821
Professor
Ken Caplan
Semester
Winter

Description
Define and Explain: • Risk  o Auditors try to reduce the risk (probability of something going wrong) by  carefully managing the engagement o The risk that an auditor will not discover errors or intentional  miscalculations (i.e. fraud) while reviewing a company's or individual's  financial statements • Materiality o Materiality is the largest amount of uncorrected misstatement that might  exist in financial statements that still fairly present the company’s financial  position and results of operations. o Misstatements are material if a users decisions would be changed  o Matter of professional judgment  o Based on surroundings and size and nature ­ Includes omissions o Based on common financial information need of users – possible specific  users needs are not considered  Unimportant errors do not affect users, cost vs. benefit analysis o Assume that users have reasonable knowledge of business and accounting  o Determines nature timing and extent of risk assessment and audit  procedures  o  Qualitative vs. Quantitative   Qualitative materiality is important because an omitted disclosure  may not have a dollar sign amount, but may affect a user’s decision o Some benchmarks (normalize/average income measures):  5% of income from continuing operations  5% of net income before bonus  ½ to 2% of revenues or expenses for NFP organizations  ½ to 1% of net asset value for the mutual fund industry  1% of revenue for the real estate industry o Performance Materiality ­ amount set by the auditor at less than  materiality for the financial statements as a whole to reduce to an  appropriately low level the probability that the aggregate of uncorrected  and undetected misstatement exceeds materiality for the financial  statements as a whole – acts as a cushion for auditor  Aggregate misstatements may cause financial statements to be  materially misstated and leaves no margin for error o Intentional misstatements, violations of the law and earnings management  are considered material, no matter what amount  o Small misstatement that can be material if they:  Mask a change in earnings or other trends,  Hide a failure to meet analysts’ consensus expectations for the  client,  Change a loss into net income or vice versa,  Concern a segment of the business that is considered significant,  Affect the client’s compliance with regulatory requirements,  Involve concealment of unlawful transactions, or  Have the effect of increasing management compensation. o If material items are not corrected, reservation required  o Need written representation from management that the effect of  uncorrected misstatements are immaterial ­ attach summary to the  representation • Significant Risk o An identified and assessed risk of material misstatement that, in the  auditor’s judgment, requites special audit consideration o Non­routine transactions, judgment involved, unusual due to size or nature  – manual intervention for accounting treatment, complex calculations o Risk of fraud?  o Controls must be tested in current period using substantive procedures and  tests of details  o Substantive procedures – reconcile financial statements to accounting  records and audit all material journal entries  • Professional Skepticism o An attitude that includes a questioning mind, being alert to conditions  which may indicate possible misstatement due to error or fraud, and a  critical assessment of evidence  o Circumstances may exist that will make the financial statements materially  misstated o Question contradictory audit evidence and reliability of documents   If documents are questionable, auditor must investigate further and  may need to do additional audit procedures  • Independence o Must not only be independent, but also appear independent to others o Unbiased and objective state of mind o Independence is the condition of mind and circumstance that would  reasonably be expected to result in the application by a member of  unbiased judgment and objective consideration in arriving at opinions or  decisions in support of the member’s report.  o • Prohibition o Circumstances and activities which members and firms must avoid when  performing an assurance engagement, because adequate safeguards do not  exist that would, in the view of a reasonable observer, eliminate a threat or  reduce it to an acceptable level  Ownership in an assurance client (financial interest) • No adequate safeguards available   Loans/guarantees  Recent employment  Creation of source documents (journal entries)  Management functions  Legal and bookkeeping/accounting services • Safeguards o Measures that are preventative in nature. There are three categories: o Safeguards created by the profession, legislation or regulation  Education, training, practical experience, professional standards,  disciplinary process o Safeguards within the assurance client  Competent employees, client’s policies and procedures, a client’s  audit committee  o Safeguards within the firm’s own systems and procedures  Firm­wide policies and procedures regarding independence,  rotation of senior personnel • Threat o Five categories of threat to independence: o Self­Interest Threat  Benefit from financial interest or self­interest conflict  Having financial interest in client o Self­Review Threat  Product/judgment from previous engagement must be evaluated o Advocacy Threat  Firm/auditor promote an assurance client’s opinion to the point that  objectivity may be impaired  Promoting shares of assurance client o Familiarity Threat  Auditor becomes too sympathetic to client’s interests due to close  relationship with client/ employees o Intimidation Threat  Auditor deterred from acting objectively or exercising professional  skepticism by threats (actual or perceived) from assurance client   Threat of being replaced over account principle disagreement • Professional Judgment o A professional reaching a complex decision by incorporating standards  and ethics in a coherent manner o Think of all possible reasons for something to have occurred o Critical thinking Important Topics • CAS – Canadian Auditing Standards by CICA • Independence – be able to respond to scenarios • Fraud, error, illegal acts o Intentional vs. unintentional misstatement  o Fraud – An intentional act by one or more individuals among involving the  use of deception to obtain an unjust or illegal advantage  Fraudulent financial reporting • Manipulation, falsification, alteration of records • Misapplication of GAAP • Overriding internal controls   Misappropriation of assets  • Embezzling, stealing, personal use o Motivation, Perceived Opportunity, Rationalization  o It’s the Board’s primary responsibility (management) o Auditor must obtain reasonable assurance that free of fraud/errors o Use professional skepticism and perform risk assessments – incorporate  element of unpredictability  o Areas of high risk: banking, investing, mining, pollution o Direct­effect illegal acts have direct and material effects on financial  statement amounts and they are dealt with in the same manner as errors  and irregularities. o Indirect­effect illegal acts refer to violations of laws and regulations that  are far removed from financial statements. o Dangling debit ­ an asset amount that is investigated and found to be false  or questionable • Going concern issue • Revenue recognition – audit issues • Risk assessment procedures (do not provide sufficient appropriate audit evidence  on their o
More Less

Related notes for ACC 821

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit