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[CYC 808] - Final Exam Guide - Everything you need to know! (39 pages long)


Department
Child and Youth Care
Course Code
CYC 808
Professor
Thom Garfat
Study Guide
Final

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Ryerson
CYC 808
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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Residential Techniques Readings, Week 3
The Context of Residential Care
Essential Components in Care and Treatment Environments for Children (Maier, 1981)
Care Giving and Care Receiving as a Symphony of Human Interactions
- Challenge of dealing with one situation fully instead of responding superficially to all
issues
- Child care, spatial arrangements, crisis handling, regular program activities, all make up
the reality of residential care
- Helping children with their effectiveness in meeting daily interpersonal crises rather than
trying to avoid conflicts; worker’s role is to increase mutual interaction and to include an
effective caring concern
- Caring involves a process of being responsive to and responsibility for someone
- People are born with a particular temperament which then require different handling
- Rhythmic activities confirm the experience of repetition and continuity of repetition, and
with it a sense of permanency and a promise of predictability (such as slogan songs,
banging on table)
- Dependency leads to independence, as most children in residential care are plagued by
uncertainty and require secure dependence upon reliable, caring adults to develop into
independent adults themselves
- In our work with children in group homes, dependency support and nurturance are
fundamental ingredients of care along with food, shelter and clothing
- Attachment is affective bonding experiences, feelings of mutual dependence known or
felt by an individual; attachment behaviors represents efforts of striving towards
attachment such as clinging and staying close
- Behavioral modification is effective as long as specific behavioral changes are conceived
as the immediate and ultimate target; interactional approach better for those with
humanistic appeal
- Attention-getting behaviors are stronger in those children uprooted from their original
living arrangements; these can actually attachment behaviors, and can be seen as efforts
to be included and not “hogging the attention,” as wanting attention is basically human
- Establishing more anchorage for children is threefold; must demonstrate an open attitude
for inclusion, worker responding sensitively to the child’s urgent appeals, and workers
preparing to overlook the child’s unsatisfactory behavior
- Creating basic bodily comfort for the youth, such as providing large pillows in the living
room or keeping the temperature at a comfortable level; sense of well-being is closely
relate to bodily comfort one experiences
- Youth need to have their own space to comfortably live in private
- Transitional objects should be encouraged as children move from one place to another,
helps them cope
- Children learn from and copy adults who they recognize as people to be counted on, can
lead to socialization based on positive relationships
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The Language of Space Physical Arrangements
- Spatial patterns have the possibility of enhancing or inhibiting activities, sometimes need
to change the space
- All humans require instances of private time and aloneness, and so we should grant this
to the youth that we work with especially in difficult times; in almost all cultures, the
bedroom is the room carrying the most personal connection
- Isolation rooms need to convey both personal reassurance and social inclusion for the
time that the child is temporarily apart from the group
Group Living as an Everyday Milieu Experience
- Children and youth in group living require life experiences within their immediate
environment which assist them to feel comfortable but also challenge and stimulate him
- Children need to learn to deal with conflict and also in learning to demonstrate caring
- Children and youth are always said to be placed or committed to a residential facility, but
never to have moved there; and just because they come somewhere new, doesn’t mean
they leave behind their past experiences and relationships
- Incorporation of parents’ and others’ active assistance into the group care program is
crucial for special events
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