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Study Guide

ENG 110- Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 32 pages long!)


Department
English
Course Code
ENG 110
Professor
Ruth Panofsky
Study Guide
Final

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Ryerson
ENG 110
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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ENG 110
September 7th, 2017
Week 1
TA: soraya.gallant@ryerson.ca
“My Papa’s Waltz
Theodore Roethke
The whiskey on your breath
Could make a small boy dizzy;
But I hung on like death:
Such waltzing was not easy.
We romped until the pans
Slid from the kitchen shelf;
My mother’s countenance
Could not unfrown itself.
The hand that held my wrist
Was battered on one knuckle;
At every step you missed
My right ear scraped a buckle.
You beat time on my head
With a palm caked hard by dirt,
Then waltzed me off to bed
Still clinging to your shirt.
1948
- Lyric Poem
- Expression of emotion → ancient greek accompanied by
a Lyre
- Subjective → individual experience, personal expression
phrased imaginatively
- Non-narrative → not written in the form of a story (mini
narrative, but not a narrative)
- Imagination
- Melody + Rhythm → song
- First person → “I”
- Third person → “He, she, him, her, they” NOT LYRIC
- Short, heightened effect, intimate effect
- Not heard, but “overheard” → a revealing of a personal
thing
- Visual information → four stanzas with four lines
“Quatrain”, couplet → two line stanza, all similar in size
- “My” → first person, “Papa” → intimate name
- Three years after the world war
- Regular rhyming scheme → with close rhyme
- SCENE: in their home, in the kitchen, the drunken father
is “dancing” with the son who is a small boy
- Waltz is a formal, graceful dance with a regular beat, the
poem is modelled after the waltz and used ironically bc
the father is drunk
- Mother is an unhappy observer, who cannot unfrown her
face → father is not steady on his feet
- The boy is holding onto his father
- Caked by dirt, battered knuckle → roughness of his
hands, ominous signs in the poem
- Challenging times and an examination of social class
- You get enough information between the father and son,
and father and mother, and mother and son
- “Still clinging to your shirt” → the love that is suggested
is that he is in his arms (his heart), because he is near
his shirt
-
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ENG 110
Week 2
Thursday, September 14
“Blackberry Eating”
- Enjambment: the continuation of a sentence without a pause beyond the end of a line, couplet, or
stanza
- Jaron: the action is happening in the immediate present
“Blackberry Eating
Galway Kinnell
I love to go out in late September
among the fat, overripe, icy, black blackberries
to eat blackberries for breakfast,
the stalks very prickly, a penalty
they earn for knowing the black art
of blackberry-making; and as I stand among them
lifting the stalks to my mouth, the ripest berries
fall almost unbidden to my tongue,
as words sometimes do, certain peculiar words
like strengths or squinched,
many-lettered, one-syllabled lumps,
which I squeeze, squinch open, and splurge well
in the silent, startled, icy, black language
of blackberry-eating in late September.
1980
- The punctuation tells us where shifts
occur through the comma, or the semi
colon → pay close attention to the
placement
- The poem is explicitly about eating
blackberries but it’s also about the art
of writing
- Starts with “late september” and ends
with “late september”
- Alliteration with “B”, there is a lot of “K”
sounds, as well.
- The use of “S” in a literary way is
called “sibilance”
- Poem: “tiny little lumps making a
whole”
- Blackberries expand juicily in his
mouth, just as words do
- Exploration of the art of writing that
brings the poet so much joy.
Sonnets → Petrach
- Italian Sonnet was brought to England by Thomas Wyatt
- One stanza, 14 lines
- Exactness
Shakespeare “My Mistress’ Eyes”
-”My”
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