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HST 701- Midterm Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 29 pages long!)


Department
History
Course Code
HST 701
Professor
Jennifer Hubbard
Study Guide
Midterm

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Ryerson
HST 701
MIDTERM EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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Ryerson University
Department of History
HST 701: Scientific Technology and Modern Society
Section 1
Fall One Semester Course Fall 2017 Upper Level Liberal Studies
COURSE DESCRIPTION
The twentieth century saw the wholesale application of scientific knowledge to technical matters.
Unlike any previous time in history, science-based technology came to define and reflect human
cultural and social attitudes and aspirations. Students in all Ryerson programs will find it useful to
study the interaction between scientific technology and human culture - and how scientific
technology is changing our understanding of ourselves.
This course is designed to provide a better appreciation of the background to current scientific
technology. It aims at developing the analytical skills needed to understand the emergence and
impact of science-based industries. The following topics are covered: 1) the coming of scientific
technology; 2) industrial chemistry shaping history; 3) nuclear physics and the promise and hazards
of nuclear energy; 4) computers and the information revolution; 5) the human genome project and
biotechnology; and 6) how technology shapes human values.
Course Instructor: Professor Jennifer Hubbard
Office: Jorgenson - Room 517
Office Hours: Mon: 2:10-3:00
Weds. 2:10-3:00
(or by appointment)
Telephone: 979-5000 ext. 7728.
E-mail: jhubbard@ryerson.ca
Please communicate using your Ryerson e-mail, and provide your full name at the end of your
message so I don’t waste time trying to figure out nicknames or strange e-mail addresses.
COURSE STRUCTURE AND MARKING SCHEME
The usual teaching mode will be class lectures. There will also be four seminar group discussions of
specific topics for which students will have done assigned readings. Attendance is compulsory.
Students will be graded on their participation, not attendance, in seminars.
Seminar Participation 15%
1 Essay (Due November 15) 35%
Term test (October 16 ) 15% (Marking time - 2 weeks)
Final Examination 35%
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In order to pass this course, each student has to complete all the work. Please keep all graded work
passed back to you to provide a back-up record.
Required Texts
Jennifer Hubbard HST 701 Scientific Technology and Modern Society Course Reader available
in the Ryerson Bookstore
Section 1 Lectures and Seminars: Mon. 1:10-2:00 VIC 608
Lectures: Weds. 12:10-2:00 VIC 501
POLICY ON PLAGIARISM
Any paper containing plagiarized materials will be assigned a grade of zero with no chance for re-
submission.
It is assumed that all work submitted for evaluation and course credit will be the product of individual
effort. Plagiarism, whether from work by other students, from published material or from
commercial sources, will result in a ‘zero’ on the assignment concerned; in the event of a
subsequent offense, a failing grade for the course itself will be given.
Plagiarism means passing off someone else’s work as your own. But to do academic work means to
build upon work already done by other people. When writing your own paper, DO:
1) use quotation marks and footnotes if you take any sequence of *5 or more words
written word-for-word* from any source.
2) if you change the words of a source but the meaning is the same, use footnotes but
not quotation marks.
3) use footnotes to give credit to someone *whose ideas you borrow*, even if you do not
use the exact words. Writing sentence after sentence of borrowed ideas without
footnotes is considered plagiarism.
4) ALWAYS provide exact and specific page numbers of the exact pages from which the
material you quote or paraphrase is taken from your source in each footnote, including articles
from e-journals. A footnote reference usually involves no more than 1 or 2 pages.
While writing ask yourself the same questions the reader will ask: “Why do you believe this?”,
“Where did you get that?”, and “Why should this claim be credible?” If you answer these types of
question by providing footnotes, you will avoid plagiarism. In addition you relieve yourself of the
burden of defending someone else’s ideas or judgements. One common-sense exception: common
information, such as the date of Edison’s birth, does not need to be cited.
Essays in which the footnotes are misleading and unconnected with the material from the
exact pages being represented as source material will be given a grade of zero.
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