Study Guides (248,450)
Canada (121,558)
History (150)
HST 325 (7)
Final

Final Exam Study Guide List

4 Pages
138 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
HST 325
Professor
Conor Burns
Semester
Fall

Description
HST325 Final exam review guide Exam: TRS107 HST325 011 20131211 15:00 7 TRS107 HST325 021 20131211 15:00 5 Make sure to arrive before the 15:00 (3pm) start time, and be sure to go to the room  for your section of the course. Also, be sure to familiarize yourself with the formal exam procedures as outlined in  the email you should have recently received from Ryerson. Coats and bags will be stored  away from the test area; you will be permitted to have at the desk pens / pencils and  photo id only. All electronic devices must be turned off and stored away from test area.  Exam is scheduled for 3 hours, which should give you plenty of time to pace yourself.  Please do not rush through the exam! In general, for any essay­type answers, the more  you write the better, so take some time to pause and reflect.  Format (not necessarily in this order): A: Paragraph answers (5 pts each; 30% of exam total; about a single spaced paragraph or  half a page each). Choice of 6 out of 8 (this may appear as two sections of Choice of 3  out of 4). B: Multiple choice (15%) C: True / false (15%) D: Essay (40%) Choice of 1out of 2. (Exam is 100 points total.) You are ultimately responsible for all material in lectures and readings, though the  primary focus for the final exth will bthmaterial covered from Week 5 onward. That  said, many developments in 16  and 17  century science can only be understood in  relation to earlier frameworks such as Aristotelianism, Ptolemaic astronomy, and Galenic  medicine, so you’ll need to be able to refer to these influential systems of thought (at  least in terms of their lasting influence).  I certainly don’t expect you to have memorized all names & dates from readings, but  you need to have good grasp of main issues & “big picture” from readings. Most  important is that you have a good sense of general chronology: what were the major  scientific & technological themes and developments for each of the eras covered in the  class (especially during the medieval, Renaissance, Seventeenth century eras). STUDY STRATEGIES: As a tip for studying, start with your lecture notes as a  general guide (ALERT: I have posted many lecture slides in Documents on BB!),  and then closely review especially Chapters 4 and 5 of Ede and Cormack. If I’ve  gone over something in lecture that is also in the readings, then you should consider it to  be important. Review your focus questions and readings for Seminars 2­3­4. Other  important readings: Friedel, Chapter 6 “Light and Time” (especially in regard to the  mechanical clock) and Chapter 7 “Types of Change” (especially in regard to the printing  press), Pacey, “Mathematics and the Arts: 1450­1600”; William Ashworth, “Christianity  and the Mechanistic Universe,” and Drake’s Introduction to the Galileo reading. It’s not a  bad idea to review your notes on Lindberg, “The Medieval Church Encounters the  Classical Tradition,” from the Coursekit.  Paragraph answers: These questions will require several sentences to answer, so think in terms of a solid  paragraph length. There won’t necessarily be five exact points you must make, and  generally there is a bit of wiggle room for these, which works to your advantage. These  questions may take several forms: a.) You may be asked a straightforward question such as “Discuss the significance of  three of Galileo’s discoveries made with the telescope” or “Why was astronomy of great  importance to medieval Islamic culture?”  b.) You may be asked to discuss the significance of a specific term or concept such as  “corpuscularianism” or “Scholasticism” in which case you would want to both define the  term and say something more about its historical significance as we’ve covered in the  class.  c.) You may be presented with an important image that we’ve encountered in the  course and asked to explain what it is and why significant. d.) You may presented with a particularly important primary source quote from one of  our main readings and asked to discuss its significance. These would not be random or  obscure quotes, but rather quotes of central significance that we’d have addressed in  class. So, even if you didn’t immediately recognize the exact words, you should be able  to identify the author and discuss the significance of the ideas expressed. So, for example,  if you were presented with a quote talking about the need for virtue to help clear the  mind’s rusty mirror, you should be able to recall that this as part of Roger Bacon’s views  on experiments from the middle ages. In general, when asked to discuss the significance of something, you want to describe /  define it and you also want to say something more about its historical significance as  addressed in the course. Essay questions: On the exam, questions based on two of the following topics will  appear and you will pick one. Because you are being given these topics ahea
More Less

Related notes for HST 325

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit