Study Guides (248,401)
Canada (121,538)
Nursing (271)
NSE 13A/B (58)
Final

Focused Examination Objective Data.docx

10 Pages
296 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Nursing
Course
NSE 13A/B
Professor
Jennifer Lapum
Semester
Winter

Description
FOCUSED  EXAMINATION  O BJECTIVE  DATA T HORAX  AND  LUNGS Now, we will move onto the objective data collection of this physical examination. I will  be first examining the posterior chest. I would like to kindly ask you to sit upright and raise your shirt up to expose your back.  POSTERIOR  CHEST Inspection I will begin by inspecting the posterior chest, specifically the thoracic cage. I will be  noting the shape and configuration of the chest wall.  The spinous processes appear in a straight line.  The thorax is symmetrical, elliptical shape with downward sloping ribs angled at  approximated 45 degrees.  The scapulae are placed symmetrically in each hemithorax. The neck and trapezius muscles are normally developed. My client is breathing with a relaxed posture, and is supporting her own weight  comfortably.  The skin colour is consistent with the rest of the body. No cyanosis or pallor. I do not see  any lesions. Palpate Now moving onto palpating of the posterior chest I am going to confirm symmetrical chest expansion by placing my warmed hands on the  patient’s posterolateral chest wall, with my thumbs at the level of T9 or T10. I am sliding  my hands medially to pinch a small fold between my thumbs. I am asking the patient to take a deep breath. I can notice that my thumbs are moving apart symmetrically, and I do not notice any lag  in expansion. Percuss I will first determine the predominant note over the lung fields. I am going to start at the  apices and percuss the band of normally resonant tissue across the tops of both shoulders.  Then, I am going to percuss bilaterally, comparing from side to side. Now, I am moving  down the lung region, percussing at 5 cm intervals, avoiding the damping effects of the  scapulae and ribs.  In healthy lung tissues in adults, I should hear resonance, a low pitched, clear, hollow  sound. I can hear resonance on both sides. Small lesions are not detectable through  percussion. I do not hear any hyper resonance or dull note, which indicate abnormal  findings.  Approaching the area of T9 to T10, I am hearing some dullness, this is expected because  this left area is visceral dullness and the right area is liver dullness. Auscultate Now moving onto auscultation, I am asking the client to sit, leaning forward slightly with  arms resting comfortably across lap. I need the client to breathe through the mouth, a  little bit deeper than usual. If the client begins to feel dizzy or hyperventilating, the client  may rest and momentarily pause.  Now with my clean stethoscope warmed, I will listen to breath sounds with the  diaphragm. I am listening to at least one full respiration. I am going to listen to the breath sounds from the apices to T10, then laterally from the  axilla down to the 7  rib.  Beginning with the apices, I am hearing vesicular sounds, soft rustling like leaves. I  continue to hear vesicular sounds. As I move down the vertebrae, I am hearing some  bronchovesicular sounds, which is harsh, rustling, hollow sounds. Then continuing down,  I am hearing more vesicular sounds, so rustling, soft, low pitch, inspiration greater than  expiration.  I can hear breath sounds throughout the posterior thoracic cage, and I do not hear any  decreased or absent breath sounds in any of the regions. I do not hear wheeze, crackles, or  any other adventitious sounds.  A NTERIOR  C HEST Inspect I am inspecting the anterior chest, and noting the shape and configuration of the chest  wall. The ribs are sloping downward with symmetrical interspaces. The costal angle is  within 90 degrees. The abdominal muscles are developed according to client’s age,  weight and athletic condition.  The patient has a relaxed facial expression. The patient is alert and cooperative. No skin lesions are observed. I would like to inspect your hands. The lips and nail beds  have no sign of cyanosis or unusual pallor. The nails are normal configuration. Now assessing the quality of respirations, the client is relaxed when breathing. Her  breathing is automatic, regular, even and effortless. Her chest expands symmetrically with  no lag in expansion.  There is no retraction or bulging of the interspaces. Accessory muscles are not used for respiration. Palpate the Anterior Chest I am palpating for symmetrical chest expansion. I am placing my hands on the  anterolateral wall with thumbs along the costal margins and pointing toward the xiphoid  process.  I am asking the patient to take a deep breath. I can see that m thumbs are moving apart  symmetrically with smooth expansion.  Percuss I am beginning to percuss at the apices in the supraclavicular areas. I am percussing  between the interspaces, and comparing bilaterally, moving down the chest. I would like  to kindly request the client to shift her breasts to the side. I hear resonance over the lung fields. Moving down the anterior chest, some dullness can  be heard due to the location of the liver in the right hemithorax. Tympany can also be  heard in the left hemithorax due to stomach.  Auscultate I am auscultating the lung field from the apices down to the sixth rib in the same  sequence as percussion.  I am asking the client to sit upright leaning forward slightly, arms resting comfortably. I  am listening to at least one full respiration. I need the client to move her breasts to the  side, so I am not auscultating directly over her breast tissues. Take deep breaths. In the  anterior chest, I am hearing vesicular sounds, rustling like leaves in the wind. Inspiration  is longer than expiration. I do not hear any adventitious sounds such as wheezing or crackles.  T HE  ABDOMEN Now we will move onto the objective data collection of the examination. I am instructing  the client to lie supine with the knees bent, and the arms resting at the side. Do you have  any painful areas?  Inspect I am first looking at the contour of the abdomen. I will first stand on the patient’s right  side, and then I will stoop to gaze across the abdomen. The contour of this patient is flat. Using my penlight, I am shining a light across the abdomen lengthwise across the patient.  I can see that the abdomen is symmetrical bilaterally, no bulging, no visible mass. Then, I  am stepping to the foot of the table to recheck symmetry. Once again, the abdomen is  symmetrical, no masses, no bulging.  The umbilicus is midline and inverted, with no sign of discoloration, inflammation, or  hernia. It is not red or crusted. The skin is smooth and even. Skin color is consistent. No redness, jaundice, lesions. I am pinching the skin, and the skin has good turgor. I do not see any pulsation or movement, a little bit of respiratory movement. Pubic hair growth has the pattern of inverted triangle shape. Patient is relaxed quietly on examining table, slow and even respirations. Auscultate Bowel Sounds and Vascular Sounds When examining the abdomen, auscultation is performed first, because percussion and  palpation can increase peristalsis, which would give false interpretation of bowel sounds.  I am using the diaphragm to hear the higher pitched bowel sounds. I will listen to all four  quadrants, beginning with the RLQ then moving clockwise. In all four quadrants, the bowel sounds are high­pitched, gurgling, cascading sounds,  occurring irregularly about 10­30 times a minute.  I will now listen to vascular sounds with the bell of the stethoscope to go over the aorta,  renal, iliac, femoral arteries. I do not hear any bruits, any blowing sounds.  Percuss I am percussing to assess the relative density of abdominal contents. I am agoing to  percuss lightly in all four quadrants. I hear tympany and I do not hear any dullness. SCRATCH TEST I am conducting the scratch test to define the liver border. I am placing my stethoscope  over the liver, and with one fingernail, I am scratching short strokes over the abdomen,  starting in the RLQ and moving slowly towards the liver. The sound was magnified at  about the area of the lowest rib cage. So the liver is within healthy span. Palpation Finally, I am going to lightly palpate in all the quadrants. Using 4 fingers, I am making  gentle rotar
More Less

Related notes for NSE 13A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit