Study Guides (248,018)
Canada (121,232)
Physics (82)
PCS 181 (33)
Final

Astronomy Final Review Class notes.docx

6 Pages
266 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Physics
Course
PCS 181
Professor
Dave Kirsh
Semester
Fall

Description
Astronomy Final Review ­ There’s 5 math questions ­ Since the last test ­ The sun: big ball of plasma o Hydrogen and helium  o Discovered helium by looking at sun o Helium has less mass then proton and that is what gives the mass defect o Sun: struggle between gravity holding it down and pressure holding it up o Social thermostat: the sun will adjust its own temperature  A very balanced thing ­ Sun structure: o Core, outer layer o Core: where we find the fusion, the driving forces of the sun o Surface: all the stuff that we see, sunspots, solar wheather, phases of the  sun spots (11 years) constant outpouring of articles, solar winds o Sun is in it’s mid life right now o The sun will die in 5 billion years ­ The sun: life and death of the sun o The sun lives midway in the hr diagram o Sun will die from inert helium in core  This is when we get red giant 10 million kelvin  Eventually core gets so hot, it becomes helium burning 100 million  kelvin. And it will still have a shell of hydrogen around it. At this  point, it won’t be a red giant anymore, this is the phase where the  sun starts to look “normal” again  Then it will be inert carbon. It will get really hot. And the outer  layer starts blowing away by solar wind. It beomes planet nebula ­ earth will be impacted by death of sun ­ high mass star will go through different phases o it will get hot enough to burn the carbon o goes through many layers, and phases o this is only for high mass stars – 25x the mass of the sun o will make onion like structure that will burn faster and faster and faster.  Iron will not burn. Because iron cannot burn to create energy.  Because nothing can be less mass per particle than iron ­ This is when you get a supernova. The supernova comes from high mass star  dying. And from iron not being able to burn. So what happens is when it collapses  so you get a supernova ­ distance is a big problem in astronomy ­ if u measure the parallax in arcseconds o d =1/p ­ you can measure how bright it looks: apparent magnitude ­ what we want to figure out is absolute magnitude: how bright does the star look if  it was 10 parsecs away o use M= m +5­ 5log(d) memorize the distance formula! ­ as for the actual magnitude system o the smaller numbers are actually brighter o negative numbers are very bright o  very faint stars at the very large positive numbers ­ absolute magnitude gets a little closer to what we really want to know… and what  we really want to know is LUMINOSITY o LUMINOSITY: how much energy the star puts out every second o If you know the physical property of the star:  L= 4piRsquaredxconstantxT4 ­ lay down the stars in the HR diagram o where everything is • white dwarfs • supergiants • giants • main sequence o also have masses on this.   Low mass star is towards the right lower corner  Higher mass star is towards the left upper corner of the hR diagram ­ y axis­ luminosity. Log scaled ­ x­axis: temperature:  o hot stars are on the left. Cool stars are on the right o the spectral system : OH BE A FINE GUY KISS ME.  The sun is a g­star  Spectral type break down how hot the star is  ­ Spectroscopic parallax o Living stars are on main sequence o Parallax, is if u wait 6 month, u can see the star move a bit o Now we can do spectroscopic parallax;  How bright it looks and how bright it is  If you know the temperature, you can figure our absolute  magnitude • And vice versa ­ Variable stars o Cepheids stars are the main stars we talked about o Lives in the instability strip o Why does it vary:  HELIUM LAYERS  Some layers can catch heat so it grows. And then release heat. So  this causes a big change in brightness • If you look at this, you can look at its period versus how  bright it is. Then you look at the graph and tell u what  period it is, and then you know the absolute magnitude and  what type of cepheids  Cepheids are very useful • We just sit there and time them so we can know how far  away they are o Half of all stars are binary  Ex: Sirius a and b  But with telescopes we can see that they sort of move around each  other  If a star comes in front o
More Less

Related notes for PCS 181

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit