Readings Propaganda Notes.doc

3 Pages
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Department
Politics and Public Administration
Course Code
POL 123
Professor
Ron Babin

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Description
Propaganda is an attempt to change opinions by persuasively presenting new ones. It is the manipulation of public opinion.The propogandanist attempts to alter the opinions of his subjects or viewers by convincing them of the validity of their own. In this paper I will argue that propaganda has been used as a weapon of manipulation by highly politized societies of the twientih century through thw media, such as films. It has been used as a weapon against evil and weapon against the good. Battleship Potemkin and the triumph of the will are exmaples of movies that portray such propogandanistic movements. Battleship Potemkin is one of thefundamental landmarks of cinema Its famous Odessa steps massacre very famous Governments believed this film had so much power that it would incite audiences to action It is a silent film – made in 1925 by Eisenstein Eisenstein wrote the film as a revolutionary propaganda film It used ‘montage’ film editing, he attempted to edit the film in such a way as to produce the greatet emotional response so that the viewer would fe3el sympathy for the rebellious sailors of the battleship Potemkin and hatred for their cruel overlords. In the manner most propaganda , the characterization was simple, so tht the audience cud see clearl whom thy shud sympathize The films potential to influence political thought through emotional response The massacre on the steps, which never took place, was presumably insetrted by Eisenstein for dramati effect and to demonise the imperial regime The film deals with a wide range of issues the Russians dealt with leading up to the communist revolutiona film A film about the time of war with Russian, many sailors on the battleship Potemkin are outraged when they come to find out that maggots are in the food that they ar being Battleship Potemkin is a silent film about the time of the war with Russia. Many sailors on the Battleship Potemkin are outraged when they come to find out that maggots are in the food that they are being served. The sailors start to form a riot in the hopes of getting control so they can be treated better. The ship’s captain starts to have his men start shooting the soldier until someone starts to reason with him and help him understand who they are about to fight. He reminds them that they are on the same side. As the men put their guns down, the sailors start a rebellion on the ship. The man that tried to help them gets killed by another officer so the sailors decide to take his body to a port city. As they are at port, there are many people gathered on the steps when a strew of soldiers arrive and start firing into the crowd. It starts to create chaos because there are citizens being shot as well. The battleship starts to respond back by firing as well. After realizing that they cannot stay and fight, they return to the ship and start to head out. Ships had been set out to destroy the Battleship Potemkin, but as they ready their cannon they also put up a signal to join them instead of fight against them. The other ship decides to join them instead and both ships rejoice with the realization that instead of being attacked they are welcomed. — D.H. I felt mixed about the battleship Potemkin. The acting is certainly over exaggerated but the same can be said of most silent films. The cinematography and editing are good for the time in which it was produced. Editing a film to heighten emotional responses was a new concept at the time. While much could be said of the editing of this movie that is not what I wish to focus on. Despite the positive aspects of this film I could not escape the fact that Battleship P
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