Study Guides (390,000)
CA (150,000)
Ryerson (10,000)
SOC (500)
SOC 107 (10)
Study Guide

SOC 107- Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 44 pages long!)


Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOC 107
Professor
Melanie Knight
Study Guide
Final

This preview shows pages 1-3. to view the full 44 pages of the document.
Ryerson
SOC 107
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

SOC 107 - Lecture 1 - Jan 24, 2017
Culture and the Organization of Everyday Life
Are You Sane?
- Having a sound mind
- How do we know? Criminality? Comparing? Medical/authority?
- Raises questions about?
- What is normal? Sense of self? Meaning of? How we show it? What criteria to
use? Sanity is socially constructed (is this illness? Is it illness somewhere else?)
- Similar issues
- Gender, morality/ethics, success/productive citizen, religion, intelligence, beauty
Cultural Expectations and Everyday Interactions
- Canadians are born into an exceedingly complex culture
- Culture
- Knowledge, beliefs, shared by people
- Knowledge, attitudes, values, beliefs, customs and morals shared by members of
a society
- Not always (not usually) about race/ethnicity
- Ex: sports culture, pop culture, Ryerson culture, work culture
- Culture becomes so familiar to us at an early age that we tend to take it for granted
- Everyday life seems to be a reality that rarely requires explanation
- We generally know which behaviours are proper in a given situation
- There are a number of cultural expectations
- Defined as social convention or norms which make up the rules for acceptable
behaviours
- Know from being told, experience, the media, learning, socialization, social
institutions
- What do they do?
- Tell us what to do, control society, lend order
- Everyone share a consensus about many conventions
- Space, time, posture/gesture, actions, behaviours
Social Convention and Social Order
- Spatial Conventions
- The study of spatial conventions or norms regarding space between people in
everyday behaviours has been labeled proxemics
- Territoriality → the physical invisible space/marker around you
- Personal space
- Waiting in line at the bus station
- Public transportation
- Classrooms
- Appropriate distances in everyday interactions
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

- Normal conversational distance is about 2 feet
- Edward Hall
- 4 common distances used in interpersonal communication
- Intimate distance → 0-18 inc (family)
- Personal distance → 1-4 feet (average is 2)
- Social distance → 4-12 feet (social gathering
- Public distance → 12 feet +
- What can be inferred from the different organization of space?
- The classroom and student/teacher spatial conventions
- One person has knowledge
- Facing teacher
- Hierarchy
- Tables only right handed
- Space only for able bodied people
- Office spaces/employment
- Open concept
- Everyone equal
- Lack of productivity and privacy
- Desk is personal space
- Create competition
- Furniture arrangement in a home
- Togetherness vs separate
- Too clean vs too cluttered
- Too formal vs not formal
*space gives meaning, how it looks, the items can change, how it’s constructed*
- Time conventions
- Temporal (time related) conventions and perceptions are linked to a society’s
level of urbanization and industrialization
- An orientations to time, rather than to task or social activities, becomes the
crucial characteristic of industrial capitalist societies
- Time conventions, capitalism and class oppression
- Karl Marx
- Disturbed by the fact that so much wealth was being created in
England during the Industrial Revolution, yet little of that wealth
was being distributed to individuals upon whose backs this wealth
was created
- The dynamic between the bourgeois (working class) and the
proletariat (lower class)
- Conflict/class oppression in industrial capitalism is focused around time
- Time clock/to surveil - Over time
- Work more efficiently - Work more/more time
- Full time/part time - Shift work
- How much time is worth/more time
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version