Study Guides (275,980)
CA (151,081)
Ryerson (10,028)
SOC (519)
SOC 808 (40)
Midterm

SOC 808 Midterm: Week 3 Notes
Premium

3 Pages
78 Views
Fall 2017

Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOC 808
Professor
Donna Appavoo
Study Guide
Midterm

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 3 pages of the document.
SOC$808$Week$3$ $ $ $$$$$$$$$1$
$
Week 3- Food Culture & Identity: You are what you eat
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ! ! Ch.!3!(p.!34)!
!
CHAPTER!3:!YOU!ARE!WHAT!YOU!EAT:!ENJOYING!AND!TRANSFORMING!FOOD!CULTURE!
¦
INTRODUCTION!
culture!shapes!how!we!eat!
!
our!culture!tells!us!how!meals!are!prepared,!what!foods!are!enjoyable,!and!which!are!taboo!
!
Food!Culture!
something!that!shapes!us!
!
people!are!dissatisfied!with!the!dominant!food!culture!and!associated!industrial!food!system:!they!
associate!it!with!threats!and!risks!like!toxic!chemicals,!overeating,!the!fear!of!fat,!genetic!engineering,!and!
food!industry!manipulation!
!
as!a!result,à!people!work!to!change!food!culture
!
Foodscape!
a!concept!that!captures!the!ways!we!understand!food!consumption!as!well!as!our!relationship!to!the!
material!reality!of!food!systems!!
Consumer!Culture!!
central!and!powerful!influence!on!the!cultural!schemas!shaping!food!choices
!
emphasizing!the!satisfaction!of!private!needs!and!desires!through!the!purchase!of!commodities!
!
tends!to!focus!on!individual!consumer!choices!as!a!central!terrain!for!cultivating!individual!pleasures
!
for!grocery!shopping,!consumers!believe!that!the!ideal!experience!should!be!aesthetically!pleasing!(e.g.!
attractive!displays),!be!convenient,!and!be!relatively!cheap!
!
¦
CULTURE!
human!processes!of!meaning-making!generating!artifacts,!categories,!norms,!values,!practices,!rituals,!symbols,!
worldviews,!ideas,!ideologies,!and!discourses
!
the!cultural!process!of!meaning-making!can!happen!in!a!specific!institution!(e.g.!a!gourmet!food!magazine),!be!
applied!to!a!specific,!defined!group!(e.g.!the!food!culture!of!immigrant!Somalis),!or!be!part!of!everyday!life!
interactions!(e.g.!the!culture!of!shame!that!exists!around!overeating)
!
KEY!TERM=!MEANING-MAKING!
how!social!interactions!convey!meaning,!and!how!we!interpret!meaning
!
the!realm!of!meaning!signals!that!culture!is!present!and!that!culture!matters!to!our!understanding!
!
food!scholars!interested!in!culture!are!interested!in!the!meaning!of!different!food!choices,!habits,!
restrictions,!and!policies!
!
¦
HABITUS!
Swidlerà!idea!of!cultural!“tool!kits”
!
seeing!culture!as!a!tool!kit!is!an!important!way!to!avoid!seeing!people!as!either!manipulated!by!culture!or!
entirely!free!agents!
he!argues!that!people!should!be!viewed!as!a!collection!of!culturally!defined!elements!that!make!up!a!tool!
kit!or!repertoire!!
from!this!repertoire,!individuals!can!pick!elements!that!sustain!habitual!behaviour!(e.g.!cooking!
from!an!old!family!recipe)!or!can!select!tools!to!explore!new!ways!of!acting!in!the!world!(e.g.!
trying!a!new!cuisine)!
by!viewing!culture!this!way,!scholars!can!appreciate!the!complex!ways!culture!is!used!by!individuals!in!daily!
life!
he!states!that!à!“not!only!do!people!use!culture,!but!culture!in!turn!uses!people”!

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
SOC 808 Week 3 1 Week 3- Food Culture & Identity: You are what you eat Ch. 3 (p. 34) CHAPTER 3: YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT: ENJOYING AND TRANSFORMING FOOD CULTURE ¦ INTRODUCTION culture shapes how we eat our culture tells us how meals are prepared, what foods are enjoyable, and which are taboo Food Culture something that shapes us people are dissatisfied with the dominant food culture and associated industrial food system: they associate it with threats and risks like toxic chemicals, overeating, the fear of fat, genetic engineering, and food industry manipulation • as a result,à people work to change food culture Foodscape a concept that captures the ways we understand food consumption as well as our relationship to the material reality of food systems Consumer Culture central and powerful influence on the cultural schemas shaping food choices emphasizing the satisfaction of private needs and desires through the purchase of commodities tends to focus on individual consumer choices as a central terrain for cultivating individual pleasures for grocery shopping, consumers believe that the ideal experience should be aesthetically pleasing (e.g. attractive displays), be convenient, and be relatively cheap ¦ CULTURE human processes of meaning-making generating artifacts, categories, norms, values, practices, rituals, symbols, worldviews, ideas, ideologies, and discourses the cultural process of meaning-making can happen in a specific institution (e.g. a gourmet food magazine), be applied to a specific, defined group (e.g. the food culture of immigrant Somalis), or be part of everyday life interactions (e.g. the culture of shame that exists around overeating) KEY TERM= MEANING -MAKING how social interactions convey meaning, and how we interpret meaning the realm of meaning signals that culture is present and that culture matters to our understanding food scholars interested in culture are interested in the meaning of different food choices, habits, restrictions, and policies ¦ HABITUS Swidlerà idea of cultural “tool kits” ★ seeing culture as a tool kit is an important way to avoid seeing people as either manipulated by culture or entirely free agents he argues that people should be viewed as a collection of culturally defined elements that make up a tool kit or repertoire • from this repertoire, individuals can pick elements that sustain habitual behaviour (e.g. cooking from an old family recipe) or can select tools to explore new ways of acting in the world (e.g. trying a new cuisine) by viewing culture this way, scholars can appreciate the complex ways culture is used by individuals in daily life he states that à “not only do people use culture, but culture in turn uses people” SOC 808 Week 3 2 ideas about good foods are also shaped by ethnic backgrounds, social class, family socialization and gender Bourdieu argues that people’s desire to appreciate culture (like fine art and good food) is not always consciously developed but reflects a less conscious desire to reproduce their class status developed the concept of habitus to reflect how certain tastes and preferences become “internalized, and converted into a disposition that generates meaningful practices and meaning -giving perceptions” the habitus typically translates peoples social class into their embodied taste preferences that may g ive them advantages later on in life • e.g. an upper middle class Canadian child who is socialized to have a taste for sushi, oysters, and French cheese may grow up to feel comfortable and natural in a variety of cosmopolitan food settingsà allowing her to travel around the world and feel comfortable with ordering food with her employers in an expensive restaurant Habitus refers to habits, dispositions, lifestyles of a social group acq uired through everyday practice We learn what to eat, how to eat, internalize this knowledge, and then define ourselves and our lifestyle
More Less
Unlock Document

Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

You've reached the limit of 4 previews this month

Create an account for unlimited previews.

Already have an account?

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit