Study Guides (291,161)
CA (139,142)
SFU (4,418)
BPK (430)
BPK 142 (70)
Midterm

BPK 142 Study Guide - Midterm Guide: Body Fat Percentage, Stanine, Adipose TissuePremium

5 pages37 viewsSpring 2018

Department
Biomedical Physio & Kines
Course Code
BPK 142
Professor
Brent Flodin
Study Guide
Midterm

This preview shows page 1. to view the full 5 pages of the document.
Week #2: Anthropometric Measurements
2. Bioelectrical impedance techniques are used to determine percent body fat.
Describe the principle on which this technique is based. Describe sources of error
in this procedure.
- Based on the principle that electrical current travels faster in muscle than in adipose
tissue. Device measures resistance of current through body.
- Water levels can fluctuate and affect results. Ie. if you drink a lot of water before testing,
drink alcohol, do intense exercise, take a bath/were in a sauna
- Tends to overestimate fat in the lean and underestimate fat in the obese
- 3-5% error in estimation of body fat
3. In the O-Scale System of body composition assessment, what is the rationale for
using a height adjustment when calculating the Adiposity rating and the
Proportional Weight rating?
- To make comparisons of body composition b/w individuals easier.
- Ex. makes more sense for comparison between individuals who are short and
overweight, and those who are tall and average weight.
4. In the O-Scale System of body composition assessment, how is the Adiposity
rating used to help interpret the Proportional Weight rating?
- Adiposity rating = fatness rating.
- Helps determine musculoskeletal development.
- A = higher if someone doesn’t exercise a lot and is slim
- W = higher for bodybuilders. Weight not mainly due to fat, but muscle
- A = W = good musculoskeletal development
5. What advantages do the O-Scale System and the CSEP Physical Activity, Fitness
and Lifestyle Assessment – Body Composition procedure have in comparison to
percentage body fat predictions from skinfold measurements, when used in
individual assessments?
- O-scale: looks at musculoskeletal development. Reason for weight (might not be due to
fat).
- CSEP path: looks at excess fat in abdominal area, as this is an area of higher health risk
(type 2 diabetes, heart disease)
- Don’t just determine whether individual is fat or not.
6. With reference to the O-Scale system of body composition assessment, describe
the following terms – stanine scale, adiposity rating, proportional weight rating,
balanced physique, dominant physique.
stanine scale: arbitrary scale in comparisons to the normal distribution, with 9 divisions
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Subscribers Only

Only half of the first page are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Subscribers Only
adiposity rating: fatness rating based on several skinfolds, then size adjustment is made
proportional weight rating: weight for height rating (based on determining what your weight
would be if you were 5’7)
balanced physique: A = W
dominant physique: A > W or W > A
7. In the CSEP Physical Activity, Fitness and Lifestyle Assessment – Body
Composition procedure, why are different norm tables used for clients under 20
years of age versus clients over 20 years of age?
- BMI changes substantially as children get older, and because adiposity varies with age
and gender during childhood and adolescence.
8. Why is measurement of waist circumference an important component of body
composition assessment?
- Higher health risk than having excess fat anywhere else in the body
- Diseases ---> type 2 diabetes, stroke, hypertension, heart disease, etc.
Week #3: Arthrology, & Flexibility
1. Be able to define the planes and axes of the body. Be able to define the various
terms of direction.
2. Be able to identify and give functions for the structures learned on the knee, hip,
and shoulder joint models.
Knee joint:
- largest and most complex joint.
- Weight-bearing
- Locomotion
- Location of patella and quadriceps + patellar ligament provides better angle of pull +
greater strength of quads.
Hip joint:
- weight bearing.
- More stable than shoulder joint (by a lot).
- Secure ball and socket joint: femur head fits into acetabulum of pelvic girdle
- bones larger and wider than shoulder joint bones
- strong joint capsules
- Wide range of movements but not as mobile as the shoulder joint
Shoulder joint:
-Combo of joints
-Glenohumeral joint designed for mobility, rather than stability
-a joint capsule, several muscles and ligaments maintain stability
-humerus head articulates w/ shallow glenoid fossa of scapula
-bones do not fit as snugly as those in hip joint
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Subscribers Only

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.