Study Guides (248,518)
Canada (121,606)
History (70)
HIST 288 (10)

5 - The Christianization of the West.docx

7 Pages
42 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
HIST 288
Professor
Emily O' Brien
Semester
Winter

Description
The Christianization of the West Initially, Christians were poor, persecuted, and competed against other religions and other versions of  Christianity.  Eventually they became tolerated and then an official state religion.  There was a great deal  of need to establish authority in the church and establish a universal doctrine.   Questions: 1. Why did it spread in the West? 2. How did it spread? 3. How “Christian” were the Westerners? (will be compared to orthodox doctrine) I.  Constantine:  Engine of Christianity’s Spread • Background − Persecution shaped the cult of the martyrs – some was government sponsored but never  wiped out the church th − By the 4  Century, 15% of the western population was Christian and 25% in the East, but  there was never a place that was wholly Christian.  − Christians were usually a minority • Constantine − Early 4  Century − Was a joint ruler of roman empire for the first half of his reign and then the sole ruler − Established the capital in Constantinople instead of in Rome − During a civil war in 312, in a key battle, he claims to have seen a cross above the sun.   “By this you shall conquer.”  Had a Christian symbol on his shield (Chi Rho).  He wins  the battle. − He attributes his success to the Christian God at the Battle of Milvian Bridge, in Rome • Developments following conversion − Edict of Milan (313):  established tolerance for ALL religions, including Christianity.  It  built on an edict years earlier.  It was the first step in making Christianity the official  religion. − Poured money into building basilicas and other religious buildings − Put Christians into government positions − Assumed religious authority as emperor:  he considered himself a bishop − Called the Council of Nicea and presided over it to establish and control doctrine.  • Why? − He favoured Christianity but was friendly to other religions − He was only baptized the night before he died and probably didn’t have an excellent  grasp on the religion itself. − He may have been politically savvy, slowly detaching from the tradition of pagan  superstition and easing into it.    − A single religion could  be useful in unifying a very diverse empire − There are however, officials who oppose this (and those who support Arianism). Post Constantine • Most emperors decide to continue to follow Christianity (or Nicene Christianity)  − Specifically the doctrine established at council of nicea. • They establish it further by de­establishing paganism − They outlaw pagan practices and superstitions − Death penalty to anyone who performs sacrifices •  Theodosius I  outlawed paganism and un­Nicene versions of Christianity − On his death in 395, Nicene Christianity becomes the only legitimate religion of the  Roman Empire • Becomes the official state religion of Rome − Non­Christians are persecuted − Churches are given privileges:  tax exemptions, clergy have power in civil disputes − Christianity can now spread more effectively because it is in a system and competition  has been knocked down. − Most of Roman empire becomes nominally Christian Who has the real power? • The Church is now closely related to government • Bishops make it clear that they want to maintain power over the church – not the state − Ambrose of Milan threatens to excommunicate Theodosius for his massacre of the  Greeks − Fight back against emperors who support Arianism − The inter­relationship between church and state becomes a source of tension • Success of the spread of orthodox Christianity also due to religious leaders who fought against  imperial powers II. The Appeal • Social and political expediency (nominally) • Miracles (especially exorcism and dealing with spirits) • Preaching and coercion • The message − Hope to the oppressed − Divine forgiveness − Eternal life − Rituals − Beliefs that embraced everyone • Adaptable to Roman empire – did not seem foreign − Adopted Latin − Embraced Roman artistic license − Incorporated Roman law − This cont
More Less

Related notes for HIST 288

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit