[SA 150] - Final Exam Guide - Ultimate 27 pages long Study Guide!

130 views27 pages
SFU
SA 150
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 27 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 27 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
SA 150 – Lecture 1: Intro
What is sociology?
The systematic study of social behaviour and human groups as well as the
relationship between the individual and the society
Focuses on social relationships, how others influence our behaviour; how major
social institutions like government, religion, economy affects us; and how
ourselves affect other individuals, groups and organizations.
E.g. during an election, you affect society by voting.
Sociologists notice social patterns: our personal experiences are affected by our
class, ethnicity, gender, age, and sexual orientation.
Social perspective: the unique way sociologists see our world and analyze the
dynamic relations between individuals and the larger social network.
Social Imagination: C. Wright. Mills
An awareness of the relationship between an individual and the society
This awareness allows all of us to comprehend the links between our immediate
personal settings and the remote social world that surrounds us and shapes us.
Involves stepping outside your own condition and looking at yourself from a new
perspective – seeing yourself as a product of your family, income level, race and
gender
Employ sociological imagination by asking yourself: who am I and why
do I think the way I do?
Peter Berger – Sociological Perspective
Defined sociological perspective as the ability to view the world from 2
perspectives:
1. Seeing the general in particular
Identifying general patterns in the behaviour of particular
individuals
Recognizing that society acts different on various categories of
people.
2. Seeing the strange in familiar
Looking at what appears to be normal and familiar and seeing it as
strange – evidence of sociological perspective beginning to
develop the sociological imagination
E.g. Canadian buses: “Sorry, it is full”, saying thank you to
bus drivers
Origins of Sociology
Ibn Khaldun (Arab scholar)
First person to carry out a systematic study of sociological subjects
Wrote Al Muqaddimah (An Intro to History)
Examines various types of societies (tribes, cities, nations,
dynasties)
Thomas Malthus
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 27 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
Studied 19th century European countries and their rapid population growth
Max Weber (German sociologist)
Protestant (work) ethic: identification of a set of values embodied in early
Protestantism that he believed led to the development of modern
capitalism.
3 Main Classical Sociological Approaches:
Structural-Functionalist Approach: Macro
Sees society as a complex system where parts work together to promote solidarity
and stability.
Identify structures of society (e.g. family) and describes the functions the
structures perform to maintain the whole social system.
Uses an organic or biological analogy for society
The belief that society is like an organism with interdependent and
interrelated structures
Structural functionalists are conservative, they want stability.
Emile Durkheim
-One of the founders of sociology
-Social fact: patterned ways of acting, thinking, and feeling that exist outside of
any one individual but exert social control over all people.
Robert Merton
-3 types of functions that any structure can produce:
1. Manifest function: the intended consequences of any social pattern
2. Latent function: the unintended consequences of any social pattern
3. Social dysfunction: any social pattern that may disrupt the operation of
the society or lead to a decrease in stability
Conflict Theory: Macro
Based on 4 C’s
Conflict – exists in all large societies
Class – has existed in every society
Contestation – who does this function best serve?
Change – assumption that society either will or should be changed
Social conflict approach is a framework for building theory that sees society as an
arena of inequality that generates conflict and change.
Power is unequally divided among members of the society and the
dominant ideologies are the means to promote the advantaged groups
interests in the expenses of disadvantaged
Karl Marx
-Class conflict is the driving force behind all major socio-historical change
-Bourgeoisie – Owners who owns the means of production
-Proletariat – workers who do not own the means of production
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 27 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in

Document Summary

The systematic study of social behaviour and human groups as well as the relationship between the individual and the society. Focuses on social relationships, how others influence our behaviour; how major social institutions like government, religion, economy affects us; and how ourselves affect other individuals, groups and organizations. E. g. during an election, you affect society by voting. Sociologists notice social patterns: our personal experiences are affected by our class, ethnicity, gender, age, and sexual orientation. Social perspective: the unique way sociologists see our world and analyze the dynamic relations between individuals and the larger social network. An awareness of the relationship between an individual and the society. This awareness allows all of us to comprehend the links between our immediate personal settings and the remote social world that surrounds us and shapes us. Involves stepping outside your own condition and looking at yourself from a new perspective seeing yourself as a product of your family, income level, race and gender.

Get access

Grade+20% OFF
$8 USD/m$10 USD/m
Billed $96 USD annually
Grade+
Homework Help
Study Guides
Textbook Solutions
Class Notes
Textbook Notes
Booster Class
40 Verified Answers