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[NAS 1000] - Final Exam Guide - Ultimate 30 pages long Study Guide!


Department
Native American Studies
Course Code
NAS 1000
Professor
Beaulieu Hendrika
Study Guide
Final

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UofL
NAS 1000
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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Introduction to the Field of Native American Studies
Things that came out of the 60s
American Studies
Native American Studies
Womens Studies early wave of feminism
Social History (the silenced had to speak)
What is it?
A relatively new discipline that integrates multiple frameworks from
disciplines such as history, sociology, psychology and anthropology.
Draws on multiple perspectives to create new ways of seeing and
knowing.
It serves:
1. To recognize and rebuild Indigenous knowledge and to generate academic
research that reflects, or is couched in, Native American perspectives.
2. It fosters approaches that reflect First nations experiences.
3. Not to understand First Nations perspectives = not only missing that
perspective, but also getting it wrong re colonial analysis.
First Programs
1949: American Indian Institute: University of South Dakota
revised and revision American Plains
1964: Native Studies department, University of Minnesota.
Fought for Metis awareness, Metis was not acknowledged
Canada
1969: Trent University: Program in Native Studies
1971: Brandon University (Manitoba)
1974: University of Lethbridge
First to open N.A. department (not just a program) in West Canada
Followed by: U of Manitoba, St. Thomas U, University of Sudbury and U of
Saskatchewan
Program and Department Increase
Due to:
Rising profile of F.N. issues both nationally and internationally
Not a new trend, turn of the 19th century saw “salvage
anthropology based on fear of disappearing peoples
As University administrators decided that the time was right to begin
disseminating First nations knowledge, members of Canada's F.N. helped
institutions forge a coherent vision statement and influenced the content of
the curriculum. Led to:
1. Proliferation of innovative research methodologies
2. Growing numbers of F.N. that have taken responsibility for their
own research.
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Salt or Blue Water thesis colonial situation is only self evident if there is
blue or salt water between the motherland and those who are colonized.
U.S. and Canada and Australia and New Zealand not a colonized situation
according to this.
Identity Crisis (Leroy Little Bear)
Studies have evolved along 3 main lines since inception:
1. Evolved along the lines of F.N. culture (F.N. art, literature, music, languages
into academia)
2. Social science lines: has attempted to consolidate existing bodies of
knowledge (such as history and anthropology) and to re-evaluate and re-
interpret that knowledge.
3. Applied: Indian education, social work, health care, = render them more
relevant to communities.
Who hold the knowledge?
In response to the fact that many early faculties at these institutions were
white males, Universities initiated elder programs, not only to consult but
hiring them as academic staff.
Females were only allowed to take programs like home ec., education
or general knowledge degrees.
Elders are also involved in graduate programs
Native Intellectual Tradition
First propounded by Jack Forbes (Powhatan- part of the Delaware nation)
Lobbied for Native Studies as a separate discipline and argued that
they had become colonial captives within the University system.
Optimistic that First Nations intellectual traditions will bridge that
gap.
Unless we do something about the education system, and the morals
and ethics they entail, we (the Native Americans) will disappear.
Counter-discourse began to argue the states quo
Vine Deloria Jr.
One of the most important Native American thinkers of all time
Degrees in law, theology and an active participant in Native American
philosophy.
*We will be discussing his work
Currently
Departments struggle between not being quite an academic discipline, but
also not being quite accountable to native ways of knowing.
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find more resources at oneclass.com
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