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Study Guide

[RLS100] - Midterm Exam Guide - Ultimate 54 pages long Study Guide!

by

Department
Recreation and Leisure Studies
Course Code
RLS100
Professor
Elizabeth Halpenny
Study Guide
Midterm

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U of A
RLS100
MIDTERM EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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Saturday, September 24, 2016
Lecture 1
RLS 100
Chp, 1 —> Meanings of Leisure
Latin phrase is: “Panem et circenses
This chapter has 3 major ideas:
1.) How leisure is reflected through the humanities
2.) Leisure historically
3.) Meanings of leisure today
The Humanities
The humanities are areas of creation who’s subject is the human experience
It includes the study of:
Literature
Art
Music
The Humanities —> Literature:
Narratives (or stories) carry us away or “transport” us to somewhere else
According to Nell (1988), there are English equivalents to the phrase “to be carried
away by a book” in German (e.g. in einem Buch versunken zu sein), French, and
Dutch
And the Chinese word rùmí may also apply (i.e. to enter into and become lost in)
Narratives (or stories) also let us learn about the negative side of human experience,
and provide insight into people’s emotions, personalities, and personal relations
(Onega and Landa Garcia call this “telling”)
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Saturday, September 24, 2016
But if too intense, we may “jump” back out of the story
Narratives often also involve drama, where the focus is on cause and effect (Onega
and Landa Garcia call this “showing”)
Narratives, for example, often provide the outcome at the beginning, but withhold key
information in order to promote interest:
With mysteries: what happened?
With tragedies: how could it happen?
An example of “showing” as tragedy can be found in first few pages of Krakauer’s
book “Into Thin Air”
The Humanities —> Art:
“Art mirrors what we consider to be both beautiful and important” (pg.5)
Take a look at the following painting, called “The Oxbow,” painted by Thomas Cole in
1836
How would you describe this painting?
What are its key features?
How does it represent its time period?
The Sublime - Nash (1982), pg. 44-45
“With the flowering of Romanticism in the 18th and early 19th centuries, wild country
lost much of its repulsiveness….
To signify this new feeling about wild places the concept of sublimity gained
widespread usage… as an aesthetic category the sublime dispelled the notion that
beauty in nature was seen only as comfortable, fruitful, and well-ordered
Vast, chaotic scenery could also please… even the fear that wilderness inspired
was not a liability”
!2
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