Study Guides (248,131)
Canada (121,336)
Sociology (207)
SOC100 (85)

chapter 3 soc.docx

10 Pages
42 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC100
Professor
Alison Dunwoody
Semester
Fall

Description
02/11/2014 Breaking Rules and Lowering Barriers Free hugs example; man gives free hugs to increase his self­esteem ▯ laws/ customs have defined what is  right and wrong, this example takes people out of their comfort zones Culture is not set in stone; we create it and have the power to change it. People doing new things, stepping  outside the lines of expected behavior, is precisely how change happens. By seizing opportunities to do the  unexpected, we create new pathways for society to follow.  Culture and Society We must construct ways of making sense of our environment; including shared language, practices, beliefs.  Shapes perception, knowledge, and understanding of the external world.  Perceive society through the lens of culture (examine norms ▯ American culture vs. rural Chinese culture) Stronger culture ▯ more likely to pass on to next generation Society provides the context through which we establish a relationship with the external world; society ▯  number of people in a similar area, sharing a culture. Regularized patterns of social interaction. ▯ high  culture (wealthy class) vs. pop culture (culture experienced by all classes) Society differs from place to place ▯ people speak French in France Cultural Universals Common culture shared by all societies (e.g. sports (soccer)) ▯ can only be expressed in the most general  of terms; mostly adaptations for needs ▯ food, shelter, clothing;  Sociobiology ▯ how biology affects social behavior; believe that our thoughts and actions can be  determined by genealogical makeup. Sociobiology is important because many claims used biology to prove  true (when they weren’t) ▯ e.g. women can’t go to college because their wombs make them too emotional Innovation: People live in different styles of homes ▯ innovation, process of introducing new ideas/ objects into cultu e ▯ have ripple effects across a society Discovery ▯ sharing a finding that exists in society, sharing KNOWLEDGE Invention ▯ cultural items combined into a form that did not exist before ­▯ e.g. parts + gas ▯ car.  Democracy.  Globalization and Diffusion: Starbucks in china; cultural innovation is globalized today; people in China drink coffee, people in Canada  eat sushi ▯ diffusion ▯ process by which some aspect of culture spreads from group to group or society to  society.  Diffusion (in past) ▯ exploration/ militarization ▯ now, people connected all over the world through internet Diffusion comes at a cost; globalization lead to cultural domination of developing nations by more affluent  nations ▯ people can disgard cultural or native values or ideas for anothers’  European fairy tales more popular in Africa than native tales Elements of Culture the totality of shared language, ideas, knowledge, material objects, practices, and beliefs which humans  create and which shape our lived environment ▯ where we put ourselves in the world; learn culture through  parents, siblings, peers, and mass media the lens through which we perceive the world around us; it is learned and shared; often taken for granted ▯  when we share a culture, it allows us to interact w one another; understand how things work ▯ hard to  explain, why things are the way they are How does one explain something they take for granted? How to explain Honey Boo Boo,  Justin Beiber, or Angry Birds Material Culture ▯ physical or technological aspects of our daily lives, including food, houses, factories,   and raw materials; serves to connect individuals with one another and to the external environment ▯ the  tangibles (the physical things) that we have and use in culture ▯ food, money, furniture, buildings, etc. How  do these tangible items connect us to one another and the external environment (help us live our lives in  the natural world)  It connects individuals with their external environment (books, clothing, cars) Revolutions in technology, esp in communication and transportation Material objects we create make new possibilities, they can also constrain us ▯ have the unintended  consequence of limiting our awareness of possible alternatives (e.g. cars altered the makeup of  neighbourhoods) Technology ▯ (Lenski) ▯ cultural info about how to use the material resources of the environment to satisfy  human needs and desires Enhances human abilities/ gives up power, speed, flight  Technological change can outstrip our ability to understand the impact of such changes.  Immaterial Culture ▯ ways of using material objecys and to customs, ideas, expressions, beliefs,  knowledge, philosophies, governments, and patterns of communication; ways of using material objects, as  well as customs, ideas, expressions, beliefs, knowledge, philosophies, governments, and patterns of  communication  language, values, norms, and sanctions Because it goes to the core of our perception of reality, non­material culture is often more resistant to  change than is material culture.  Culture lag ▯ non­material culture tried to adapt to changes in material culture; ethics of Internet are still  being discussed, while Internet continues to grow every day Language ▯  language is the most basic building block. System of shared symbols, and non­verbal  gestures an expressions. Foundation of a common culture, allows us to COMMUNICATE.  We adapt our language to new technologies (e.g. spamming was not a word before) Language can give insight into a culture; English is war­like ▯ bombed a exam, killing the stock market ▯  can be seen as warfare having an importance in English language Slave Indians of Canada have over 14 names for ice ▯ because they live in a cold climate, shows that ice is  important part of culture A system of shared symbols (includes speech, written characters, numerals, symbols, and non­verbal  gestures and expressions), the primary facilitator of culture, language shapes reality ▯ determines how we   see the world, how we make sense of the world Sapir­Whorf hypothesis – we conceptualize the world only through language, language precedes  thought, while words do construct reality they also reflect that reality Our thoughts are based on language, cannot have a thought without using language In some languages, there is no word for WAR. Language shapes it reality but also reflects its reality. The  language that does not have a word for war still has to learn about it/ experience it ▯ will become a word  when such an experience is met Language does more than describe reality, it can shape reality of a culture ▯ Canadians don’t think ice is  too important, so wont recognize 14 different types of ice ▯ the language a person uses shapes his/ her  thoughts and actions. Since people conceptualize a word only through language, language  precedes   thought. Word symbols of grammar organize the world for us. Language is not a given;  culturally  determined and encourages a distinctive interpretation of reality by focusing our attention on certain  phenomena.  Criticism ▯ although words do construct new phenomena, they are also made to reflect other phenomena Support: Humans can determine over 1 million colours, but we only have about 11 terms for colour in  English Jobs, policeman, fireman ▯ male dominated, feminism would say language is inaccurate now ▯ police  officer now, firefighters Language transmits stereotypes based on race; black (dark, gloomy) while white (noble, pure) Blacklist ▯ banned list White lie ▯ a bad thing for a noble reason Language can shape our senses and influences the way we think about people; ideas; objects around us Non­Verbal Communication The use of gestures/ facial expression. Other visual signals that can differ from one culture to the next ▯  Australia, giving thumbs up is rude Values collective conceptions of what is good, desirable, and proper – or bad, undesirable, and improper – in a  culture often contradicted by our behaviour (i.e., ideal vs. real culture) Canadians value equality, justice, value individualism (people should have the lives that they want, and do  what they want) Tend to be vague and abstract ideas, very operationalized, but also bring stability to a culture Often contradicted by our actual behavior ▯ values do not often coincide; difference b/w what we say we  believe in (ideal culture) and what we actually do (real culture)  Ideal ▯ we are environmentally responsible vs. real ▯ drive around in SUV’s A personal set of standards; we have personal values and there is also a general set of objectives as  members of a society Values ▯ collective conceptions of what is considered good/ bad in a culture. Values may be specific, such  as honoring one’s parents or genera, such as health and democracy Individualism represents a collective value, which is prized in Canadian culture ▯ each individual protected  by a constitution ▯ cannot impede upon the rights of others Values of a culture may change, but most remain stable during one’s lifetime ▯ constitution stands from  1880’s In most countries, values are mostly similar; including benevolence (forgiveness and loyalty)  Canadians are known to value diversity and kindness above all; however, as kind as we seem, there is a  huge issue with cheating in Canadian schools ▯ an emerging subculture of cheating has grown in a culture  that is against it Issues with privacy ▯ rights to privacy have changed recently especially with the 9/11 terrorist attacks and  gov’t invasion of personal privacy for “public security” ▯ Partiot Act/ Bill C­36 Norms: established standards of behavior maintained by a society ▯ how values are put into practice; a culture’s  expectations for how a persons’ supposed to act/ think/ look prescriptive (what we should do) or proscriptive (what we shouldn’t do) ▯ wash hands in the  bathroom, pay bills on time, stand in line Not supposed to drink and drive, no cheating on midterm Differences between these t
More Less

Related notes for SOC100

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit