Study Guides (248,410)
Canada (121,516)
POLI 201 (10)
Final

LONG ANSWER QUESTIONS FINAL REVIEW.docx

5 Pages
115 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POLI 201
Professor
Jay Makarenko
Semester
Fall

Description
LONG ANSWER QUESTIONS 1. Many political scientists argue that the Prime Minister in the Canadian  parliamentary system is often more powerful than a President in the American  presidential system. Why might this be the case? Before examining the powers of the Canadian Prime Minister and the President of the  United States, it is important to be familiar with the systems of government of both  countries. Canada is a parliamentary system. The Canadian Parliament is a bicameral  institution, consists of the House of Commons and the Senate. The government of the  day if formed mostly from the House. The leader of the majority party becomes the  Prime Minister and chooses his ministers from among the members of the House to  make up his Cabinet. Thus, the prime minister is the head of government and also the  head of the Cabinet. The Cabinet determines legislative priorities and sets the  legislative agenda. It is a collective decision­making body, but dominated by the PM  and run according to his or her particular style. Because the government is formed  from the House, the government is kept in check by the House. In other words, the  exercise of power depends on the government’s ability to maintain the confidence of  the House – that is, the support of the majority of the House – in order to remain in  office. However, as the leader of the party and government, the PM’s influence is felt  strongest in the House through the practice of party discipline, meaning that MPs  within any party vote together on every occasion, as predetermined in the party caucus  meeting, and enforced by party whip. In the case of a majority government, the PM  only needs to control his own party in the House to pass legislative and maintain  power. The Canadian PM, especially of a majority government, is very powerful. He is  the head of the government, the leader of the party, and the head of the Cabinet. The  PM and his Cabinet members initiate party policies and caucus members are expected  to support it. Thus, the Canadian PM almost always gets what he wants. Meanwhile, the US has a different system of government, called the presidential  system. While the parliamentary system is known for its fusion of powers, the  presidential system is known for its separation of powers. The executive branch is  physically separated from the legislative branch. However, cooperation is required to  pass legislation. The president of the United States is chosen by the people. However,  his powers are limited by Congress, the American legislative branch. Congress, like  the Canadian Parliament, is a bicameral body, consists of the House of Representatives  and the Senate. Congress checks the president in the executive area, and the president  checks Congress in the legislative area. The system of separation of powers presents an  1 obstacle to policy­making, because unless both the president and Congress have the  same vision, policy­making process tends to be time­consuming. Unlike the Canadian  system of government, where the PM controls the House and has the ability to impose  the practice of party discipline on his party members, the president of the US does not  have that power, and because the president is elected by the people and has no seat in  Congress, he is unable to influence Congress even if his party is the majority party in  Congress. Thus, the president of the US, compared to the Canadian PM, is less as  powerful. 2. Compare and contrast the strengths and weaknesses of both a single­member­ plurality (SMP) and proportional representation (PR) system. The single­member­plurality system (SMP), also known as “first past the post” system  is popular used in Britain, Canada, and the United States. One candidate is elected in  each electoral district (constituency) and each voter has one vote to cast. If there are  only 2 candidates, the winner automatically gets a majority. If there are more than 2  candidates, the winner’s plurality may be far less than a majority. A candidate with the  most votes becomes representative for that electoral district. SMP tends to produce a  majority government, which is one of the strengths of the SMP system. A majority  government ensures a stable government. The Prime Minister and his Cabinet is  secured in the exercise of power. A stable government also ensures efficiency and  certainty in policy­making. Plus, the process is also less time­consuming. SMP also  ensures confidence and accountability. Citizens know that their government will get  things done, and know who is responsible for good or bad policies. However, critics of  the SMP system argue that the system produces unfair representation. A party with less  than majority electoral support gains majority of government. In the 2011 Federal  Election, the Conservatives won majority with only 40% of electoral support. 60% of  Canadians voted for political parties on the left side of the political spectrum. The proportional representation (PR) system, on the other hand, strives to ensure  proportionality. This system seeks to reward parties with a percentage of seats in the  legislature that reflects the percentage of votes earned in the election. The benefit of  this system is that it ensures better representation of the diverse set of views in the  Canadian society. However, the weaknesses of such system are also significant. The  system often leads to minority government, which is very unstable. The PM and his  Cabinet cannot secure their exercise of power. Policy­making tends to be time­ consuming, which reduces the level of efficiency. Citizens are uncertain and  apprehensive about their government because they won’t know whether the  government will get things done on time (or get things done at all), and who is  2 responsible for the good/bad policies. 3. Discuss the importance of judicial independence in a liberal democracy. The most important purpose of a court system in a liberal democracy is to administer  justice equally to all citizens. Unequal treatment before the law constitutes a violation  of one of the principles of liberal democracy. There must be judicial independence  from direct political influence. Judicial independence is the principle that judges  should be isolated or separated from direct political influence. Judges must be neutral. 4. Cultural politics is often about legitimacy in government. Using either Quebec,  Aboriginals, OR recent immigrants as an example, discuss how cultural politics in  Canada challenges traditional ideas about legitimacy in a liberal democracy.  Modern liberal democratic societies represent a plurality of different cultural, racial  and ethnic groups. These groups have very different views about morality, society and  politics. Moreover, there is often inequality between different cultural groups in terms  of their economic, political, or social power in society. Liberal democracies often  attempt to manage cultural politics through its guarantees of individual freedom and  formal equality. Individual freedom means that the govt must respect basic freedom  that is important to cultural practices, such as the freedom of religion. Formal equality  means that the govt must treat all in
More Less

Related notes for POLI 201

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit