[RELS 200] - Final Exam Guide - Everything you need to know! (31 pages long)

798 views31 pages
Published on 29 Nov 2016
School
University of Calgary
Department
Religious Studies
Course
RELS 200
Professor
UofC
RELS 200
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 31 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 31 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
RELS 200 Narrative Paradigms
Walter Fisher coined the term and argues that narrative paradigms are the basic framework in
which people operate.
Thomas Kuhn made the term popular and wrote a book that became a key text in education.
He said that a paradig is defied as pre-science. Before you had siee, there
is an element of human thought that tries to make sense of the world.
Development of science challenges the existing understanding of the world and
leads to a crisis.
After crisis, a major revolution changes the way we see the world and becomes
the e oral (the accepted way of seeing the world).
o (ie. in the medieval world, people thought that the world was flat and
that the Sun revolved around the Earth. Following scientific discoveries,
people then came to know that the world is round and that the Earth
revolves around the Sun.)
o Kuhs desriptio is ot etirely orret as ost people did ot eliee
the world was flat (ancient Egyptians know the world was round). Kuhn
then says that the big change was not that the world was round, but that
the Earth resolved around the Sun and that this was the change that
brought about the scientific revolution
Kuhn says that a paradigm is a model (an imaginary analogy) in which you
perceive the world and that we are not aware of the models in which we see the
world
Paradigm shift: when a new paradigm emerges and creates radical change (ie. geocentric
system to heliocentric system)
Normal science: identify a problem, make observations (empirical research), hypothesize, test
using experiment, collect and analyze data, reach conclusion, communicate results puzzle
solig
Theory is based upon facts therefore science is an entirely rational discipline
Involves a series of steps that allow us to investigate natural occurrences
Revolutionary science: a theory that is only accepted by a few people at the beginning but
eetually people start to hage their opiio ad the old theory dissipates paradig shift
We are not learning the absolute truth of things, as science is constantly changing.
According to Kuhn, different areas of science move between normal and
revolutionary phases
o We are not progressing in knowledge; we are simply seeing a new
perspective of the way that the world is
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 31 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
It is impossible to believe both normal science and revolutionary science at the
same time (ie. you cannot think that the world is both flat and round at the same
time)
Bernard Cohen, Karl Popper, and Steve Fuller rejeted Kuhs ie
Fuller says that the argument that Kuhn put forward was intended to destroy the
discipline of sociology
Popper argues that Kuhs arguet doest hold ater eause the Coperius
odel ast a jup i thikig ad as a rather gradual hage
Cohen gives plenty of historical detail about scientific arguments at the time and
says that Kuh is rog eause he didt take into account the notion of
falsification
Fisher takes the framework of narrative paradigm as the way we see life as a story (we
experience life as series ongoing narratives as conflicts, characters, beginnings, middles, ends
etc.)
Says we need to recognize the importance of stories because they do shape the
way people think
Kenneth Burke Fishers etor argued that hile Aristotles ies aout rhetori ad logic
are ery useful i aalyzig arguets, hats left out is ho do you oe fro akig a
convincing argument to getting people to act on it
Once someone believes something is true, how do you get them to act on it? (ie.
tuition is too high, everyone believes that, but how do you get students to strike
for lower fees?)
Fisher says to tell people the right story in order to inspire them to take action
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 31 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in

Document Summary

Walter fisher coined the term and argues that narrative paradigms are the basic framework in which people operate. Thomas kuhn made the term popular and wrote a book that became a key text in education. He said that a paradig(cid:373) is defi(cid:374)ed as (cid:858)pre-science(cid:859). Before you had s(cid:272)ie(cid:374)(cid:272)e, there is an element of human thought that tries to make sense of the world. Development of science challenges the existing understanding of the world and leads to a crisis. Kuhn then says that the big change was not that the world was round, but that the earth resolved around the sun and that this was the change that brought about the scientific revolution. Kuhn says that a paradigm is a model (an imaginary analogy) in which you perceive the world and that we are not aware of the models in which we see the world.

Get OneClass Grade+

Unlimited access to all notes and study guides.

YearlyMost Popular
75% OFF
$9.98/m
Monthly
$39.98/m
Single doc
$39.98

or

You will be charged $119.76 upfront and auto renewed at the end of each cycle. You may cancel anytime under Payment Settings. For more information, see our Terms and Privacy.
Payments are encrypted using 256-bit SSL. Powered by Stripe.