Study Guides (248,058)
Canada (121,268)
Anthropology (156)
ANTH 1150 (116)
Final

Anthropology Exam Review.docx

5 Pages
150 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Anthropology
Course
ANTH 1150
Professor
Linda Hunter
Semester
Fall

Description
Anthropology Exam Review • Anthropology shows the difference in modern and ancient cultures around the  world. • Anthropologists study human beings wherever and whenever they find them. • Anthropology studies the human condition: Past, present and future; biology,  society, language and culture. • Holistic Science: Holism refers to the study of the whole of the human condition:  past present and future. • Cultures are traditions and customs transmitted through learning that form and  guide the beliefs and behavior of the people exposed to them. • Culture is not biological but bio has a lot to do with culture and vice versa.  Language is taught but our bodies are incapable of speaking without certain  muscles to learn. • Exploring ancient civilizations we discover the mysteries of human existence like  bones and tools. • Adaptation refers to the processes y which organism cope with environmental  forces and stresses, such as those posed by climate and topography or terrains,  also called landforms. • Innovations and how they change us. Progression of food: Hunters/Gatherers­ Food production/agricultural revolution­Industrial Revolution. • General Anthropology also known as four­field anthropology: sociocultural,  archaeological, biological and linguistic anthropology. Sociocultural is also  referred to as cultural anthropology. • Changes in social life and customs affect the way people act. • Archaeologists use studies of living societies to imagine what life might have  been like in the past. • “Human nature” cannot be derived from studying a single population because all  civilizations are different.  • Comparative, cross cultural approach is essential. • Biological or physical, anthropology 1. Human evolution as revealed by the fossil record(paleoanthropology) 2. Human genetics 3. Human growth and development 4. Human biological plasticity(ability to cope with adversity) 1. The biology evolution, behavior and social life of monkeys, apes, and  other nonhuman primates. • Linguistic Anthropology­ ancestors acquired the ability to speak, although  biological anthropologists have looked to the anatomy of the face and the skll to  speculate about the origin of language. • Linguistic and cultural anthropologists collaborate in the studying links between  language and many other aspects of culture, such as how people reckon kinship  and how they perceive and classify colors. • Anthropology blends biological, social, cultural, linguistic, historical and  contemporary perspectives. • Anthropology is a humanistic science devoted to discovering, describing,  understanding, and explaining similarities and differences in time and space  among human and our ancestors. “The science of human similarities and  differences” • Anthropology is the holistic, bicultural and comparative study of humanity. It is  the systematic exploration of human biological and cultural diversity across time  and space. Examining the origins of and changes in human biology and culture,  anthropology provides explanations for similarities and differences among  humans and their societies. Chapter 2 • Children absorb any cultural tradition rests on the uniquely elaborated human  capacity to learn. • Our own cultural learning depends on the uniquely developed human capacity to  use symbols, sign that have no necessary or natural connection to the things they  stand for or signify. • Symbolic thought is unique and crucial to humans and to cultural learning. A  symbol is something verbal or nonverbal, within a particular language or culture  that comes to stand for something else.  • Culture is an attributed not of individuals per se but of individuals as members of  groups. Culture is transmitted in society. Don’t we learn our culture by observing,  listening, talking and interacting with many other people? Shared beliefs, values,  memories, and expectations link people who grow up in the same culture. • Culture takes the natural biological urges we share with other animals and teaches  us how to express them in particular ways. • For anthropologists, culture includes much more than refinement, good taste,  sophistication, education and appreciation of the fine arts. • The most interesting and significant cultural forces are those that affect people  every day of their lives, particularly those that influence children during  enculturation. • Cultures are not haphazard collections of customs and beliefs. Cultures are  integrated patterned systems. • Culture is the main reason for human adaptability and success. • Humans also adapt biologically­for example, by shivering when we get cold or  sweating when we get hot. • People also use culture to fulfill psychological and emotional needs, such as  friendship, companionship, approval, and being desired sexually. • Hominidae is the zoological family that includes fossil and living humans, as well  as chimps and gorillas. • The term hominis is used for the group that leads to humans but not to chimps and  gorillas and that encompasses all the human species that ever existed. • Certain biological, psychological, social, and cultural features are universal, found  in every culture. Others are merely generalities, common to several but not all  human groups. Still other traits are particularities unique to certain cultural  traditions. • A cultural particularity is a trait or feature of culture that is not generalized or  widespread; rather it is confined to a single, culture, or society, yet because of  cultural borrowing, which has accelerated through modern transportation and  communication systems, traits that once were limited in their distribution have  become more widespread. • Cultures vary in just which events merit special celebration. • Cultures vary tremendously in their, beliefs, practices, integration, and patterning,  by focusing on and trying to explain alternative customs, anthropology forces us  to reappraise our familiar ways of thinking. • Culture and the individual agency and practice: the system can refer to various  concepts including culture, society, social relations, or social structure. • Culture is both public and individual, both in the world and in peoples minds.  Anthropologists are interested not only in public and collective behavior but also  in how individuals think, feel, act. • Culture has been seen as social glue transmitted across the generations, binding  people through their common past, rather than as something being continually  created and reworked in the present. • The practice theory recognizes that individuals within a society or culture have  diverse motives and intentions and different degrees of power and influence. • All of us creatively consume and interpret print media music television, films,  theme parks, celebrities, politicians and other popular culture products differently. • International culture extends beyond and across national boundaries. Because  culture is transmitted though learning rather than genetically, cultural traits can  spread through borrowing or diffusion from on group to another. • Subcultures are different symbol­based patterns and traditions associated with  particular groups in the same complex society. • Ethnocentrism is the tendency to view ones own culture as superior and to apply
More Less

Related notes for ANTH 1150

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit