Study Guides (248,317)
Canada (121,484)
Economics (205)
ECON 3960 (6)
Midterm

Econ 3960 Midterm Review.docx

9 Pages
591 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics
Course
ECON 3960
Professor
Eveline Adomait
Semester
Winter

Description
Econ 3960 Review Chapter 1 Terms:  Financial markets: Markets in which funds are transferered from people who have an  excess of available funds to people who have a shortage. Crucial to promoting economic  efficiency by channeling funds from  people who do not have a productive use for them  to those who do Security: (Financial instrument): a claim on the issuer’s future income or assets Bond: Debt security that promises to make payments periodically for a specified period  of time Interest rate: Cost of borrowing or the price paid for the rental of the funds (usually as a  percentage of 100$ per year) Common stock: Represents a share of ownership in a corporation Financial intermediaries: Institutions that borrow funds from people who have saved  and in turn make loans to others Financial crises: Major disruptions in financial markets characterized by sharp declines  in asset prices and failures of many financial and non financial firms. Banks: Financial institutions that accept deposits and make loans. Aggregate output: Total production of goods and services Unemployment rate: Percentage of the available labour force that are unemployed Business cycles: the upward and downward movement of aggregate output produced in  the economy Recessions: periods of declining aggregate output Monetary theory: Theory that relates changes in quantity of money to changes in  aggregate economic activity and the price level Aggregate Price Level: Average price of goods and services in the economy Inflation: A continual increase in the price level, affects individuals, businesses and the  government.  Inflation rate: the rate of change of the price level, usually measured as a percentage  change per year. Monetary Policy:  The management of money and interest rates Central bank: Organization responsible for the conduct of a nation’s monetary policy Fiscal Policy: Involves decisions about government spending and taxation.  Budget defecit: Excess of government expenditures over tax revenues for a particular  time period (usually a year) Budget Surplus: When tax revenues exceed government spending Foreign exchange market:  Instrumental in moving funds between countries.  Foreign exchange rate: Price of one country’s currency in terms of another’s.  determined in the foreign exchange market Appreciation: When exchange rates increase so that a Canadian dollar buys more units  of a foreign currency Depreciation: Decline in the exchange rate of the Canadian dollar Summary:  Activities in financial markets have direct effects on individual’s wealth, the behavior of  businesses, and the efficiency of our economy. Three financial markets deserve particular  attention: bond market (where interest rates are determined), Stock market(Which  has a major effect on people’s wealth and on firms’ investment decisions) and the  Foreign exchange market (Because fluctuations in the foreign exchange rate have major  consequences for the Canadian economy) Banks and other financial institutions channel funds from people who might not put them  to productive use to people who can do so and thus play a crucial role in improving the  efficiency of the economy Money appears to have a major influence on inflation, business cycles, and interest rates.  Because these economic variables are so important to the health of the economy, we need  to understand how monetary policy is and should be conducted. We also need to study  government fiscal policy because it can be an influential factor in the conduct of  monetary policy Chapter 2: Liabilities: IOUs or debts Maturity: The maturity of a debt instrument is the number of years until that  instrument’s expiration date Short term: A debt instrument is short term if its maturity is less than a year.  Long term debt instrument: If maturity is ten years or longer Intermediate­term debt instrument: Maturity between 1 and 1­ years. Primary market: Financial market in which new issues of a security are sold to initial  buyers by the corporation or government agency borrowing the funds Secondary market: Financial market in which securities that have been previously  issued can be resold Investment bank: A financial institution that assists in the initial sale of securities in the  primary market Underwriting: guarantees a price for a corporation’s securities then sells them to the  public Brokers: Agents of investors who match buyers with sellers of securities Dealers: Link buyers and sellers by buying and selling securities at stated prices Over the counter market (OTC): market in which dealers at different locations who  have an inventory of securities stand ready to buy and sell securities “over the counter” to  anyone who comes to them and is willing to accept their prices Money market: Financial market in which only short term debt instruments are traded Capital market: Market in which longer term debt (one year or more) and equity  instruments are traded.  Overnight interest rate: A closely watched barometer of the tightness of credit market  conditions in the banking system and the stance of monetary policy. When it is high, it  indicates that the banks are strapped for funds, whereas when it is low, bank’s credit  needs are low. Foreign bond: Bonds sold in a foreign country and are denominated in that country’s  currency. Ex German automaker Porsche sells a bond in Canada denominated by  Canadian dollars. Eurobond: a bond denominated in a currency other than that of the country in which it is  sold. Ex. Bond issued by Canadian corporation that is denominated in Japanese yen and  sold in Germany Eurocurrencies:  Foreign currencies deposited in banks outside the home country  Eurodollars: US dollars deposited in foreign banks outside the US, or in foreign  branches of US banks. Financial intermediation: Primary route for moving funds from lenders to borrowers. Transaction costs: Time and money spent in carrying out financial transactions Economies of scale: Reduction in transaction costs per dollar of transaction as the size  (scale) of transactions increases. Liquidity Services: Services that can make it easier for customers to conduct  transactions Risk: Uncertainty about the returns investors will earn on assets Risk sharing(Asset transformation): Financial intermediaries create and sell assets with  risk characteristics that people are comfortable with, and then use the funds they acquire  by selling these assets to purchase other assets that may have far more risk Diversification: Investing in a collection (Portfolio) of assets whose returns do not  always move together, with the result that overall risk is lower than for individual assets Asymmetric information: In a financial market, one party often does not know enough  about the other party to make accurate decisions Adverse selection: problem created by asymmetric information before the transaction  occurs. Occurs when potential borrowers who are the most likely to produce an  undesirable (adverse) outcome­the bad credit risks­, are the ones who most actively seek  out a loan and are thus more likely to be selected Moral hazard: Problem created by asymmetric information AFTER the transaction  occurs. It is the risk that the borrower might engage in activites that are undesirable  (immoral) from the lender’s point of view because they make it less likely that the loan  will be paid back Financial panic: The widespread collapse of financial intermediaries, caused by  asymmetric information. Summary chapter 2: Basic function of financial markets is to channel funds from savers who have an excess  of funds to spenders who have a shortage of funds. Financial markets can do this either  through direct finance, in which borrowers borrow funds directly from lenders by selling  them securities, or through indirect finance, which involves a financial intermediary that  stands between the lender­savers and borrower­spenders and helps transfer funds from  one to the other. This channeling of funds improves the economic welfare of everyone in  the society. Becaue they allow funds to move from people who have no productive  investment opportunities to those who do, financial markets contribute to economic  efficiency. In addition, channeling of funds directly benefits consumers by allowing them  to make purchases when they need them most Financial markets can be classified as debt and equity markets, primary and secondary  markets, exchanges and over the counter markets, and the money and capital markets. Principal money market instruments (debt instruments with maturities of less than one  year) are treasury bills, certificates of deposit, commercial paper
More Less

Related notes for ECON 3960

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit