Study Guides (247,988)
Canada (121,207)
Economics (205)
ECON 3960 (6)
Midterm

ECON 2560 Midterm review.docx

9 Pages
366 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics
Course
ECON 3960
Professor
Eveline Adomait
Semester
Winter

Description
ECON 2560 Midterm review Chapter 1: Terms Corporation: Business owned by shareholders who are not personally liable for the  business’ liabilities Limited liability: Principle that the owners of the corporation are not personally  responsible for its obligations Public Company: corporation whose shares are listed for trading on a stock exchange Private Company: corporation whose shares are privately owned Sole proprietorships: Owned and operated by one individual, responsible for all the  business’ debts and other liabilities. Bank can target personal belongings if loan payments  can’t be made Partnership: similar to sole proprietorship, partners also have unlimited liability and  must agree on how earnings will be divided.  Capital Budgeting Decision/ Investment decision: Decision as to which real assets the  firm should acquire Financing Decision: Decision as to how to raise the money to pay for investments in real  assets Capital Structure:  A firm’s mix of long term financing  Real assets:  Assets used to produce goods and services Financial Assets: Claims to the income generated by real assets. Also called Securities. Treasurer: Manager responsible for financing, cash management, and relationships with  financial markets and institutions Controller: Officer responsible for budgeting, accounting and auditing.  Chief Financial Officer (CFO): Officer who oversees the treasurer and controller and  sets overall financial strategy. Agency Problems: Conflict of interest between the firm’s owners and managers Stakeholder: Anyone with financial interest in the firm. Chapter 2: financial markets and institutions Primary Market: Market for the sale of new securities by corporations Secondary Market: Market in which already issued securities are traded among  investors Fixed­Income Market: Market for debt securities Capital market: Market for long­term financing Money Market: Market for short term financing (less than  a year) Financial Institution: A bank, insurance company or similar financial intermediary Financial Market: Market where securities are issued and traded  Pension Fund: Investment plan set up by an employer to provide for employees’  retirement.  Private Equity Fund: Investment fund focused on investing in equity of privately owned  businesses Financial intermediary: An organization that raises money from investors and provides  financing for individuals, corporations or other organizations Mutual Fund: A managed investment fund, pooling the savings of many investors and  investing in a portfolio of securities Exchange­traded fund: An investment fund, traded on a stock exchange, that pools the  savings of many investors and invests in a portfolio of securities, selected to replicate an  established securities index.  Liquidity: The ability to sell or exchange an asset for cash on short notice Cost of Capital : Minimum acceptable rate of return on capital investment Chapter 3: Accounting and Finance:  Balance Sheet: Financial statement that shows the value of the firm’s assets and  liabilities at a particular time Generally Accepted accounting principles (GAAP): Procedures for preparing financial  statements Book value: Net worth of the firm according to the balance sheet (EX: bought equipment  for 1 million two years ago, but would now sell for 1.3 Million. Book value = 1 million,  market value = 1.3mil Income Statement: Financial statement that shows the revenues, expenses and net  income of a firm over a period of time. (measures profitability) Statement of Cash flows: Financial statement that shows the firm’s cash receipts and  cash payments over a period of time.  (sources and uses of cash during the year) The  change in company’s cash balance is the difference between sources and uses Cash flow from assets: Cash flow generated by the firm’s operations, after investment in  working capital and fixed assets. Also called free cash flow. Financing flow: Cash flow to bondholders and shareholders plus increase in cash  balances; also equals cash flow to assets.  Marginal tax rate: Additional taxes owed per dollar of additional income Average Tax Rate: Total taxes owed divided by total income Chapter 3 Summary Investors and other stakeholders in the firm need regular financial  information to help them monitor the firm’s progress. Accountants summarize this  information in balance sheet, income statement and statement of cash flows.  Income is not the same as cash flow. Investment in fixed assets is not deducted  immediately from income, but is spread over the expected life of equipment, and the  accountant records revenues when a sale is made, rather than when the bill is paid.  Cash flow from assets measures the cash generated through operating activities and after  making necessary investments in net working capital and fixed assets. Either distributed  to firm’s investors, creditors, and shareholders, or held in reserve by the firm as cash and  marketable securities. Must equal Financing Flow of the firm. Chapter 5 Bond: security that obligates the issuer to make specified payments to the bondholder Coupon: The interest payments paid to the bondholder Face value or principal: Payments at the maturity of the bond. Also called par value, or  maturity value Coupon Rate: Annual interest payment as a percentage of face value Accrued interest: Coupon interest earned from the last coupon payment to the purchase  date of the bond.  = Coupon payment X number of days from last coupon to purchase  date/number of days in coupon period Clean Bond Price: Bond price excluding accrued interest Dirty Bond Price: Bond price including accrued interest.  Current Yield: Annual Coupon payment divided by bond price Premium Bond: Bond that sells for more than its face value Discount Bond: Bond that sells for less than its face value Yield to Maturity: Interest rate for which the present value of the bond’s payments  equals the price. Ex. Buying 3 year bond at face value, yield to maturity is the coupon  rate, 10%. $100/(1.10) + 100/(1.10)^2 + 1100/(1.10)^3 = $1,000 Rate of Return: Total income per period per dollar invested. = coupon income + price  change divided by investment  Yield curve, or Term structure of interest rates: Graph of the relationship between  time to maturity and yield to maturity, for bonds that differ only in their maturity dates.  Real Return Bond: Bonds with variable nominal coupon payments, determined by a  fixed real coupon payment and the inflation rate.  Fisher Effect: The nominal interest rate is determined by the real interest rate and the  expected rate of inflation.  Interest rate risk: The risk in bond prices due to fluctuations in interest rates Default (or credit) risk: The risk that a bond issuer may default on its bonds Default premium or credit spread: The additional yield on a bond that investors require  for bearing credit risk.  Investment grade: Bond rated Baa or above by Moody’s, or BBB or above by Standard  and Poors or DBRS.  Junk Bond: Bond with a rating below Baa or BBB Summary Chapter 5 A bond is a long term debt of a government or corporation. When you 
More Less

Related notes for ECON 3960

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit