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Final

HIST 3130 Study Guide - Final Guide: Begging, Morale, Pickpocketing

6 pages104 viewsFall 2017

Department
History
Course Code
HIST 3130
Professor
Linda Mahood
Study Guide
Final

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KEY: QUEEN VICTORIA
Repression Hypothesis: sex went inward during the
Victorian period.
Domestic feeling that family were the heart of society. Women look at the
domestic/home front and males work outside the home.
Sentiment was also a word frequently used (notice the beauty around them
and the purity)
The stereotype was that they were very prudish.
They were passionless, men may go to prostitution for discretion behaviours
and women saw this as shameful and they required chastity.
Did not talk about.
Move inside the home, for reproduction, not pleasure.
Conspiracy of silence.
17th Century Frankness about Sex
Sex practices had little secrecy
Words were said
A tolerant familiarity with the illicit
Lax codes and gestures
Shameless discourse
Sex was discussed in front of children
History of Syphilis
Sin, Science and Sexuality
Medical profession--pressure group
Structure for confinement (prisons, asylums, penitentiaries)
Medical
Hygienic
Moral
Segregation would make things more sanitary.
Began arguing for hospitals where the disease could be studied (like a laboratory)
They also wanted to look at the culture and the lifestyle of prostitution
Expectation was that they would voluntary stay in the area for three months and go
through mercury treatment. It was applied orally unlike in pill form like men who
could get it at a clinic. They thought the cure really needed to hurt.
(aka:Pox, French Disease, Grandgore)
Origins of the Disease:
Fundamentalist, Unionist, Columbian, Astrological
Legal control:
First appeared 1460s
Aberdeen Acts (1497) Kirk Session (1549, 1587)
Medical control (1600):
Lock Hospitals (1800s) and leprosy
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o Cure: 400 yrs of mercury
Syphilis & Popular Culture
Prostitution was quite visual
Joking about syphilis
Only cure at the time was mercury (could get poisoning, similar symptoms)
Lock Hospital: engrafted in poverty and filth…
vile and loathsome diseases
Debate: Only for women with syphilis (physical)
o medico-scientific vs. fundamentalist
Resolution:
o environmentalism
o eugenics
o Community responsibility …to reform unhappy females…
Female penitentiaries for moral rehabilitation
Fallen women spread it to men
Still believe they have a moral responsibility to cure person even if its just to
make the earth better.
Some thought it was wrong to even try to cure it as it was just going to
spread vice (fundamentalist thinking)
Science has a responsibility for future generations (reform the unhappy
females)
Fallen Women and Wayward Girls
Kind of women who found themselves in this.
Sex trade (but not 100% certain)
Homeless, jobless, ill or had to choice but to go here
Treated as if they were a prostitute
Seduced or had been raped
Young woman needed the moral rehabilitation
Not much said about men
Casted in the role of victims, could not help themselves.
Not seen that they made this conscious choice
Morally corrupt economic order (poverty is causing this while others say it
was lack of disease fact or attracted to sin)
Male lust and women needed to be protected (feminists)
Remember Discourse and Media/Journalism impacting situations*
Discourse
Sexuality was continually and volubly put in to discourse
Define: concepts, analytical tools, sets of values, knowledge, practices and
ideologies
Justify a set of social relations (power)
Discourse defines its object/sexual subject
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