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HROB 3100 Study Guide - Comprehensive Final Guide: Creative Problem-Solving, Synectics, CreativityPremium

33 pages245 viewsFall 2016

Department
Human Resources and Organizational Behaviour
Course Code
HROB 3100
Professor
Jamie Gruman
Study Guide
Final

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UofG
HROB 3100
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE
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HTM*3100 Developing Managerial and Leadership Competencies (J. Gruman)
Chapter 1: Developing Self-Awareness (p. 37-66)
Sensitive line: the point at which individuals become defensive or protective when
encountering information about themselves that is inconsistent
Threat-rigidity response: when individuals are threatened, encounter uncomfortable
information or when uncertainty is created, they tend to become rigid
Self-disclosure: revealing to others ambiguous or inconsistent aspects of oneself, a
process necessary for growth
Interpersonal competence: the ability to manage conflict, to build and manage high-
performance teams, to conduct efficient meetings, to coach and counsel employees, to
provide negative feedback in constructive ways, to influence others opinions and to
motivate and energize employees
Process: a sequential set of activities designed to lead to a specific outcome
Five Core Aspects of Self-Awareness
Emotional intelligence: the ability to correctly diagnose and manage ones own
emotions and relationships with others
o The ability to diagnose and recognize your own emotions
o The ability to control your own emotions
o The ability to recognize and diagnose emotions displayed by others
o The ability to respond appropriately to emotional cues
Personal values: an individuals standards that define what is good/bad,
worthwhile/worthless, desirable/undesirable, true/false, moral/immoral
(instrumental and terminal)
Cognitive style: the manner in which you gather and process information
Orientation toward change: an individuals adaptability to ever-increasing levels of
ambiguity and turbulence
Core self-evaluation: a concept that captures the essential aspects of personality; it
accounts for the five personality dimensions (neuroticism, extroversion,
conscientiousness, agreeableness and openness)
Learning style: the way in which individuals perceive, interpret and respond to
information
Cultural Values
Universalism: the ethical decision principle that a decision is right and proper if
everyone would be expected to behave in the same way under the same circumstances
Particularism: an emphasis on relationships and close personal connections to govern
behaviour, used in contrast to universalism orientation (one of the key dimensions that
identifies international cultural differences)
Affective orientation: an emphasis on open displays of emotion and feeling as being
acceptable, used in contrast to a neutral orientation (one of the key dimensions that
identifies international cultural differences)
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Neutral orientation: an emphasis on rational and stoic approaches to problem solving,
used in contrast to an affective orientation (one of the key dimensions that identifies
international cultural differences)
Specificity orientation: an emphasis on separating work, family and personal roles in a
society, used in contrast to diffusion orientation (one of the key dimensions that
identifies international cultural differences)
Diffuseness orientation: an emphasis on integrating work, family and personal roles in a
society, used in contrast to specificity orientation (one of the key dimensions that
identifies international cultural differences)
Achievement orientation: an emphasis on personal accomplishment and merit as the
basis for getting ahead, used in contrast to an ascription orientation (one of the key
dimensions that identifies international cultural differences)
Ascription orientation: an emphasis on attributes such as age, gender or family
background as the basis for getting ahead, used in contrast to achievement orientation
(one of the key dimensions that identifies international cultural differences)
Organizational culture: the values and basic assumptions typify an organization, refers
to the most basic elements of an organization, or just the way things are done around
here
Value Dimensions
Explanation
Example of Countries with
Dominance
Universalism
Particularism
Societal rules and norms
are valued
Individual relationships are
valued
U.S., Switzerland, Norway,
Sweden
Korea, Venezuela, China,
Indonesia
Individualism
Collectivism
Individual contributions are
valued
Team contributions are
valued
U.S., Nigeria, Denmark, Austria
Mexico, Indonesia, Japan,
Philippines
Affective
Neutral
Showing emotions is valued
Unemotional responses are
valued
Iran, Spain, France, Switzerland
Korea, Ethiopia, China, Japan
Specific
Diffuse
Segregating lifes roles is
valued
)ntegrating lifes role is
valued
Holland, Sweden, Denmark, U.K.
China, Nigeria, Singapore, Korea
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