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Unit 4


Department
Marketing and Consumer Studies
Course Code
MCS 2020
Professor
M.J.D’ Elia

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UNIT 04- INFORMATION FLUENCIES
Technological competency: (SOMETIMES FCALLED TECHNOLIGY
LITERACY)
It’s tempting to define technological competency (sometimes called
technology literacy) as simply being skilled with technology, but that’s only
half of the story. In addition to demonstrating skill-based abilities,
technologically competent individuals must have a broader understanding of
the technology itself. Like information literacy, technological competency
combines both practice and theory.
If we take ACRL’s information literacy standards and replace the word
“information” with “technology” we end up with a pretty good list of
standards. The technological competent individual:
Determines the nature and extent of the technology needed.
Accesses and uses the needed technology effectively and efficiency.
Evaluates the technology and its capabilities critically and incorporates
selected technology into his or her personal information management.
Uses technology effectively to accomplish a specific purpose.
Understands many of the ethical, legal and socio-economic issues
surrounding technology.
Information literacy:
The information literate individual:
Determines the nature and extent of the information needed.
Accesses the needed information effectively and efficiency.
Evaluates information and its sources critically and incorporates selected
information into his or her knowledge base and values system.

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Uses information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose.
Understands many of the ethical, legal and socio-economic issues
surrounding information and information technology.
While these standards were designed for academia, we can easily adapt these
principles to business context. As you can see, information literacy describes
both theory and practice. People need to have a certain comfort level with
managing information (how to search, find, retrieve and summarize
information), but they also need to know a bit more about broader
information issues (how knowledge is produced, how information is
structured, how to use information ethically, etc.).
Your level of information literacy may vary depending on what type of
information you’re looking at. For example, maybe you’re quite good at
finding business literature and applying management theory, but when it
comes to locating financial data and reading income statements you’re
hopelessly lost. Information literacy is a moving target.
Communication: leads to information sharing, information sharing leads
to shared meaning, shared meaning leads to community building, and
community building leads to identify forming. In other words,
communication is at the core of our identity- its how we learn about others,
our communities and ourselves
Knowledge production/ Knowledge Creation:
Knowledge creation (sometimes called knowledge production or knowledge
processes) has changed radically because of the introduction of the Internet
and other information technology. The traditional knowledge production
process follows these stages (roughly):
Idea is born. Author composes her thoughts on a topic and writes a
coherent argument.
Idea is refined. Author submits her piece to a series of “information
gatekeepers” (editors and reviewers) who provide feedback. The original
piece is tweaked based on the reviewers’ commentary.
Idea is published. Once the draft suitable for publication, it is handed to a
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publisher and published in an appropriate format (book, journal, magazine,
etc.).
Idea is organized. Published work is described and categorized (by
librarians, indexers, etc.) and is organized into existing knowledge systems.
Idea is distributed. Published work becomes accessible to a broader
readership through the publisher’s distribution channels (e.g. direct sales,
book stores, etc.).
Depending on the type of information being produced, this process can take
years or even decades (e.g. for extensive longitudinal research projects).
This publishing model has been stable for hundreds of years and still exists
today, but the advent of Internet publishing has changed the game entirely.
Advantages of online knowledge creation include:
More efficient knowledge distribution. The Internet acts as both the
medium for the information and the distribution channel for the message.
Dissemination is not restricted to limited distribution channels or paper-
based formats.
New knowledge representation. Digital information enables authors to
create new types of knowledge products and services (video, animation,
audio, etc.).
Shortened information production timeline. Authors can bypass
gatekeepers and publish directly online, enabling the audience to consume
the information more quickly.
Of course, the move to Internet publishing has its disadvantages too. Cutting
out the “gatekeepers of the knowledge production process may ultimately
lead to lower quality information (no one to check the facts), higher
quantities of irrelevant information, and more biased perspectives. Clearly,
we need our information literacy and technological competency standards
more than ever.
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