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MUSC 2150- Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 36 pages long!)


Department
Music
Course Code
MUSC 2150
Professor
Shannon Carter
Study Guide
Final

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U of G
MUSC 2150
Final EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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Friday, September 30, 2016
Week 10 Notes
Funk and Fusions (Text page 335-352) 329-344
Black Pop in the 1970s
-Sly and the Family Stone: Sly Crosses Over
it is difficult to exaggerate the influence of Sly and the Family Stone on the course
of black pop at the end of the 1960s
with the 1971 album There’s a Riot Goin' On, the bands music began to adopt a
more militant stance, at times focusing on racial and political issues
-In Sly’s Wake: Ohio Players, Kool and the Gang and Earth, Wind and Fire
the funk element of the Family Stone’s music paved the way for many dance-
oriented African American groups in the early 1970s
Ohio Players released a series of singles without much commercial success, in
1973 their song “Funky Worm” hit number one on the rhythm and blues charts,
followed by lots of number one albums
Kool and the Gang was also influenced by Sly - developed their music skills in
Jersey
-emerged as a crossover act in 1973 with the album Wild and Peacful
-Both the Ohio Players and Kool and the Gang built on Sly’s blending of funky
rhythms and catchy vocals
-The Rock Connection: Tower of Power and War
Tower of Power was also part of the Bay Area hippie scene - celebrated for its hard-
driving funk grooves and high caliber horn section
-Motown in the 1970s:
Motown was quick to absorb the changes in black pop that characterized the late
1960s
lots of emerging new groups
!1
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Friday, September 30, 2016
By the early 1970s Motown was mostly run from Los Angeles after Berry Gordy had
left Detroit to pursue a broader range of possibilities for his company in Southern
California
Many consider the 1960s to be the golden age of Motown, Gordy’s company
continued to record impressive roster of successful artists
-Motown Measures: Stevie and Marvin:
Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder, were two Motown artists in particular were
allotted freedom to work outside the traditional system of Berry Gordy on the West
Coast
Marvin Gaye experimented as a song writer and producer
Stevie Wonder was also given complete artistic control over his records and
produced a series of albums that each cohered in a similar manner to album-
oriented rock
-While wonder was a leading force in African American dance music and balladry,
his experiments with new sounds and timbres and studio techniques were highly
indebted to rock
-The Philadelphia Sound: Gamble and Huff
during the second half of the 1960s Gamble and Huff were independent producers
in Philadelphia, writing songs and producing records for the rhythm and blues
market
Philadelphia International became quickly known as the home of the Philadelphia
sound
James Brown, George Clinton and Parliament/Funkadelic
-Soul Brother Number 1
in the first half of the 1970s, a style that came to be called funk was closely
associated with black culture in the minds of both black and white listeners
Much of the success of funk before the 1970s can be attributed to the work of
James Brown
Brown had success in both mainstream and soul markets and was a voice within
the black communit with the 1968 song “Say it Loud, I’m Black and Proud”
!2
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