Study Guides (248,462)
Canada (121,563)
Philosophy (113)
PHIL 1010 (34)
Midterm

REVIEW MIDTERM.docx

11 Pages
89 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 1010
Professor
Karyn Freedman
Semester
Winter

Description
REVIEW Week 1 Introductory Philosophy  Social and Political Issues  Contemporary political philosophy asks these questions: 1. Who gets what? Distribution of ‘goods’?  2. Says who? (Who is in charge, who distributes political power?) Traditional Picture Equality  Liberals  Free Market  Alternative View: “Every plausible political theory has the same ultimate or foundational value which is equality.” What theory has the best conception of equality? This means that equality is the starting point  Equality might be an intrinsic value Intrinsic/inherent value: Something that is valuable in and of itself.  Instrumental value: Something that is valuable as a means to an end. (Money) Equality as foundational: the idea that equality Is intrinsically valuable and the foundation of  any reasonable political theory.  Logic is the study of inference­ of inferential reasoning­ about what follows from what.  Arguments in philosophy are totally unlike the arguments you have with a friend or family  member. We usually mean a fight.  A argument is a verbally articulated expression of reasoning. In logic, an argument is not  disagreement or quarrel.  **An argument consists of a set of sentences consisting of one of more premises, which contains  the evidence, and a conclusion, which is supposed to follow the premises. ** Here is an example of an argument: Socrates is a man (premise) All men are mortal  (premise)  Thus, Socrates is mortal  good in itself , Libertarian view: the free market is inherently just and redistributive  ­ ­ taxation is inherently wrong…a violation of people’s rights  ­ People have the right to dispose freely of their goods and services and they have this right  whether or not it I the best way to ensure productivity  ­ Rawls Says: if you have nothing to give, you still shouldn’t starve  ­ Noziak’s view: If you are entitled to what you currently own, no one is entitled to take  anything away from you  Robert Nozick’s entitlement theory:  ­ If we assume that each person is entitled to the goods they currently posses (their  holdings), then a just distribution is simply whatever distribution results form peoples free  exchanges  3 Principles  1. A principle of transfer: Whatever is justly acquired can be freely transferred.  ­ Issues: How do you acquire something legitimately  2. A principle of just initial acquisition: an account of how people came in
More Less

Related notes for PHIL 1010

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit