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[PSYC 2310] - Final Exam Guide - Everything you need to know! (59 pages long)


Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYC 2310
Professor
Saba Safdar
Study Guide
Final

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UofG
PSYC 2310
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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PSYC 2310 INTRO LECTURE ONE
- Discussion posts must be about 2 paragraphs, 1 page max
- Must reply to someone else’s post as well
- Register iclicker via psychology website (will be posted on courselink)
- 2 iclickers per class, for 18 classes (3 marks dropped)
- Exam and midterms will be 50% lecture and 50% textbook
- No need to know researchers names and dates BUT need to know their studies
EXCEPT THESE PSYCHOLOGISTS (must know name and their significance) found in
lecture 1
Gordon Allport, Muzafer Sherif, Kurt Lewin, Solomon Asch, Leon Festinger and
Stanley Milgram
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- Very few, if any, humans can survive without any social interaction
- Humans are social animals
- Social psychology is a study of:
i) Social thinking what we think others think of us
ii) Social influence how others influence our behaviour and vice versa
iii) Social relatedness how we connect to others, connection is harmonious
- Social psychology: The scientific study of the way in which a person’s thoughts,
feelings and behaviours are influenced by real or imagined presence of other people
- Bolded words above make social psychology different than other psychologies
- Social psychology follows a different set of rules and methods for study and research
- Social psychology looks at a person’s thoughts, feelings and behaviours, along with
social connections (ABC - affect, behaviour and cognition) NOT a group of individuals
- Physiology (humanities) vs. psychology (social science)
Social psychology differs from philosophy because social psychology is
EMPIRICAL
- Three values of science:
i) Accuracy unbiased and representative population otherwise results would be
invalid
ii) Objectivity hold off on bias, know that your culture has an effect on behaviour
iii) Skepticism 2 studies produce different results, then the study must be replicated
to prove one correct
PSYC 2310 LECTURE TWO: SOCIAL SELF (Ch. 3)
- 1000s of literature on personality
- “Know thyself”
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
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- “No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of a continent, a part of the
main” John Donne
- Social psychology looks at how we are connected to others and those connections are an
indication of who we are and how we define ourselves
- Question: Who are you?
Self-concept (me, your knowledge of yourself) or self-knowledge
Self-awareness (I you are creating yourself)
Student at UofG part of an identity
Driver’s license – name, date of birth
Social identity Indian
Personal hobbies and interests (i.e. interested in science)
Little children would talk about physical characteristics (ie. Eye color, mother and
father)
Adults understand themselves better and talk beyond physical characteristics
talk about psychological characteristics (mentioned above)
- Definitions: SELF
Three features of self (Baumeister, 1986)
i) Self includes the body (sense of consciousness)
ii) Self includes social identity (Student, Canadian, Hindu, Immigrant,
connections with someone bigger than yourself group or nationality)
iii) Self is the active agent (I you are creating who you are, if you take
science and you take science courses, it becomes a part of yourself)
- Functions of selfhood: Why do we have a sense of self, what is the use of self?
Makes you an individual to help make connections
You are a separate entity from another person
Need self in order to function (imagine waking up everyday and having to make
new friends, doing something new)
i) Self is an interpersonal tool (helps you make personal relationships,
engages you in a particular behaviour)
ii) Self makes choices (Goals for yourself i.e. grad school)
iii) Self-regulation (you regulate how to behave and how to respond, you
regulate which goal is more prioritized than another goal)
- Self-knowledge: Knowledge you have about yourself
i.e. good in science, personality traits such as honesty, outgoing, perfectionist
How do these people come to know of these characteristics?
Self-knowledge comes from:
i) Self-comparison (Over time, you complete certain tasks and you recognize
traits of yourself in your tasks)
ii) Feedback from others (i.e. friends, family, what other people tell you)
Self as a blank slate? When you were born, were you blank? Nobody told you
who you are, you haven’t done anything to have a sense of self
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
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