Study Guides (248,131)
Canada (121,336)
Sociology (577)
SOC 1100 (84)
Final

Sociology Final Review.docx

15 Pages
174 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC 1100
Professor
Linda Gerber
Semester
Fall

Description
Sociology Review  “The Foundations of Sociology” • The Sociological Perspective  o Structural­functionalism: sees society as a complex system whose parts work together to promote  solidarity and stability   Implies social structure – relatively stable patterns of social behavior; social functions  (components serve some purpose or meet some need)  (formal organization, bureaucracy)  (regulation of sexuality – procreation/family)  (deviance affirms cultural values and norms; responding to deviance clarifies moral  boundaries, promotes social unity or solidarity; encourages social change)  (procreation and raising of children, socialization, regulation of sexual activity, social  placement, economic and emotional security)  (structural mobility, meritocracy, retirement – mandatory)  o Symbolic interaction: envisions society as the product of the everyday interactions of individuals  If we interact differently or change our behavior, society changes accordingly  Society is a shared ‘reality’, constantly constructed and reconstructed on the basis of  subjective meanings and responses   (dyads, triads)  (the social construction of sexuality; negotiated reality through interaction)  (labelling theory)  (social construction of reality/the experience or meaning of family; defined and shaped by  the interaction of its members)  (the meaning of work; negotiating social reality in the workplace; the informal side of  bureaucracy/organizations) o Social conflict: envisions society as an arena of inequality generating conflict and change  (highlights not solidarity but division – class, race, ethnicity, sex or age are linked to unequal  distribution of money, power, education or prestige)  Social structure benefits some while deprives others  ▯conflict   Privilege causes privilege = continuing reality = continuing conflict   (diversity, minority groups)  (reflects inequality – arrest the prostitute, not the client; creates inequality – women as a sex  object)  (deviance reflects social inequality; deviants share powerlessness and stigma; links between  deviance and power – norms reflect interests of the powerful)  (reproduction of labour force, property and inheritance, patriarchy, race and ethnicity, gay  rights)  (unions, unemployment, credentials –immigrant?, women in the workforce) o Feminism and postmodernism  • Sociological Investigation o Science: concepts, variables, measurement   Concept: mental construct that represents part of the world  Variable: concept whose value changes from case to case   Measurement: process of determining the value of a variable in a specific case  o Scientific sociology, interpretive sociology, and critical sociology   Scientific Sociology • Positivism: a doctrine contending that sense perception are the only admissible  basis of human knowledge and precise thought  • Empirical evidence (verify with our senses) • Structural­functional (can identify and predict patterns of behavior)  Interpretive Sociology • The study of society that focuses on the meanings people attach to their social world  (sees reality as constructed by people themselves – not as objective reality – relies  on qualitative data  Critical Sociology  • The study of society that focuses on the need for social change  • Rejects the notion that research should be value free  • Appeals to people on the left of the political spectrum  • Often carried out on behalf of people who are disadvantaged (visible minorities,  women, Aboriginals, seasonal workers) o Theory and methods   Surveys  • Random samples • Questionnaires (written questions – either close­ended or open ended) • Interviews   Participant­observation • Systematic observation of people while joining in routine social activities   Using available data • Secondary analysis of data collected by others  • Culture: the essential ingredient  o The values, beliefs, behaviors, and material objects that constitute a people’s way of life o Non material (intangible) and material (tangible)culture  o Distinguishes between societies; allows for the development of personal identity; makes social  interaction possible o Culture shock is the personal disorientation that comes from encountering an unfamiliar way of life  o Symbols: anything that carries particular meanings that are recognized by people who share that  culture  o Language: a system to symbols that allows members of a society to communicate with one another;  allows cultural transmission; shapes society  o Values (cultural standards) and beliefs (statements that people hold) colour our perception and form  the core of our personalities  o Norms: rules and expectations by which a society guides the behavior of its members  o Counterculture: cultural patterns that strongly oppose those widely accepted within a society  (hippies, Goths, Hell’s Angles, Dead Heads) o Cultural Change: continuous; cultural integration (close relationship between elements of a cultural  system); cultural lag (uneven change among elements, leading to disruption and strain) • Society: evolution, Marx, Weber, Durkheim o Society  Refers to people who interact in a defined territory and share culture   Experience equilibrium (sometimes short­lived) strain and change  o Sociocultural Evolution: the process of change that results from a society’s gaining new  information, particularly technology   Advances in technology trigger increasingly rapid social change  Hunting and gathering  ▯post­industrial society  o Karl Marx (1818­1883)  Saw the expansion of empire and the gap between a small elite and the masses (the richest  societies contained the desperately poor)  Social conflict (the struggle between segments of society over valued resources)  Capitalists owned the means of production   Profits and wages from same pool of funds = ongoing conflict  Social institutions: the major spheres of social life or society’s subsystems, organized to  meet basic human needs (the economy, political system, the family, education and religion)  False consciousness = social problems explained in terms of the shortcomings of individuals  rather than flaws in the social system (religion and education perpetuate false  consciousness)   Class conflict (antagonism between entire classes over distribution of wealth and power)  Class consciousness (the recognition by workers of their unity as a class in opposition to  capitalists and, ultimately, to capitalism  Alienation (the experience of isolation resulting from powerlessness [for Marx])   Revolution (overthrow of capitalists and capitalism to achieve socialism or communism)  o Max Weber (1864­1920)  Societies differ in the way their members think about the world; pre­industrial societies  adhere to tradition, while people in industrial societies endorse rationality   Rationality (refers to deliberate calculation of the most efficient way of achieving a specific  goal)  Protestantism and capitalism   Rational social organization involves: distinctive social institutions, large­scale  organizations, awareness of time, personal discipline to achieve ‘success’   Bureaucracy transformed the larger society as industrialization transformed the economy   Alienation due to stifling regulation and dehumanization  o Emile Durkheim (1858­1917)  Society exists beyond ourselves (more than the individuals who compose it; created by  people, society takes on a life of its own and thereafter constrains us)  Social facts have functions (ex., crime)  Social system (elements of society, working together in relative equilibrium)   Anomie (condition under which individuals lack moral guidance (normlessness)   Modernization (for Durkheim involved an expanding division of labour)  • Socialization: humanity, the process, agents o Humanity: human behavior is not biologically set, relying instead on learning the nuances of  culture; social contact develops the capacity for thought, emotion, meaningful behavior and motor  skills  o Socialization: the lifelong social experience by which individuals develop their human potential and  learn the patterns of their culture  Sigmund Freud (basic human needs = bonding and aggression)  Id (the human being’s basic drives)  Ego (a person’s conscious efforts to balance innate, pleasure­seeking drives with the  demands of society   Superego (the operation of culture within the individual)  o Nature vs. nurture  o Agents of socialization (the family, education, peer group, mass media, technology) • Social Interaction: status, role, performance, dramaturgical analysis  o Status: a recognized social position that an individual occupies; does not mean prestige – involves  particular duties, rights and expectations for individual behavior (is a key component of social  identity – occupation)  Status set (all the statuses a person holds at a given time – people can gain and lose)  Ascribed status (one which the individual has little or no choice – assumes at birth or  acquires involuntarily later in life)  Achieved status (a social position one assumes voluntarily and that reflects ability or effort)  Master status (a status that has exceptional importance for social identity, often shaping a  person’s entire life) o Role: behavior expected of someone who holds a particular status   Role set (a number of roles attached to a single status)  Role conflict (incompatibility among roles corresponding to two or more statuses – surgeon  and mother)  Role strain (incompatibility among roles corresponding to a single status – husband,  economic and marital roles) o Dramaturgical analysis   The investigation of social interaction in terms of theatrical performance  • Groups and Organizations: dyads/triads, groups, networks, formal organizations, bureaucracy  o Groups provide people with shared experiences, loyalties and interests  o Dyad (a social group with two members; most meaningful – marriage; characterized by instability –  both must commit)  o Triad (social group with three members, more stable than a dyad) o Networks (a web of social ties that links people who identify and interact little with one another; a  web of weak social ties) o Formal organizations (large, secondary groups that are organized to achieve their goals efficiently) –  accomplish complex jobs rather than meet personal needs o Bureaucracy (an organizational model rationally designed to perform complex tasks efficiently)  • Sexuality: sex=biological; gender=social construct; sexual revolution/orientation  o Gender is a social construct by which culture guides the behavior, beliefs and feelings of males and  females o Sexual revolution: changed the behavior of women more than men  The “pill” removed fear of pregnancy  Few remain abstinent till marriage  o Sexual counter­revolution: conservatives   “family values”  Against practices associated with the spread of STDs, AIDs/HIVs o Orientation (a person’s preference in terms of sexual partners: same sex, other sex, either sex, or  neither sex)  • Deviance: social control, strain theory, labelling theory, crime, criminal justice  o Deviance: the recognized violation of cultural norms   Crime (the violation of norms a society formally enacts into criminal law)  Deviants (positive or negative) are viewed by other as outsiders  o Social control: various means by which members of a society encourage conformity to norms   Reactions to deviance are mild to severe (raised eyebrows to imprisonment) o Robert Merton (Strain Theory) – the scope and character of deviance depends on how well a society  makes cultural goals accessible by providing the institutionalized means (Merton developed a  typology of types of deviance based on the fit between goals and means)  Conformity (acceptance of both goals and means)  Innovation (acceptance of goals, rejection of means  Ritualism (rejection of goals, acceptance of means)  Retreatism (rejection of goals and means)  Rebellion (seeking new goals through new means) o Labelling Theory (symbolic interaction analysis) – the assertion that deviance and conformity result  not so much from what people d
More Less

Related notes for SOC 1100

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit