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SOC 2700 Study Guide - Comprehensive Midterm Guide: Crime Prevention, Glasser'S Choice Theory, Neighborhood Watch


Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOC 2700
Professor
Reza Barmaki
Study Guide
Midterm

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UofG
SOC 2700
MIDTERM EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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Chapter 5
1. Choice Theory
-Crime data tells us that most offenders are young makes who abstain from crime as they
mature
oThe bulk of adult offending is committed by few persistors
-To criminologists, persistence is a function of personal choice
-Illegal acts is a matter of individual decision making, a rational choice mad after weighting
out benefits and consequences
-Risk of punishment is worth the crime
Choice theory – the view that delinquent behavior is a rational choice made by a motivated
offender who perceives the chances of gain as outweighing any perceived punishment or
loss
oFirst appeared as classical criminology
-Classical criminology – the theory that people have free will, choose to commit crime for
reasons of greed or need, and can be controlled by only the fear of criminal sanctions
-Criminals behavior can be controlled or deterred by the fear of punishment
-Desistance is explained by a growing and intense fear of punishment
THE DEVELOPMENT OF CLASSICAL THEORY
-Beccaria saw people as egotistical, self centered needing to be controlled by the fear of
punishment
-Believed that punishment should be proportionate to the crime
-Crime can be controlled by the judicious applications of criminal punishments
Utilitarianism – a view that believes punishment of crime should be balanced and fair and that
even criminal behavior is purposeful and reasonable
-Actions are evaluated by their tendency to produce advantage, pleasure and happiness and
to avoid or prevent mischief or unhappiness
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Chapter 5
Punishment objectives
1. Prevent all criminal offences
2. Convince the offender to commit the least serious crime possible
3. Ensure that a criminal uses no more force than is necessary
4. Prevent crime as cheaply as possible
CHOICE THEORY EMERGES
-Criminals are rational actors who plan their crimes, fear punishment and deserve to be
penalized for their misdeeds
DOES CRIME PAY?
-Rational offenders are induced to commit crime if they perceive that crime pays more than
they could earn from a legit job
-mid-rate burglars earn about 32% of what they could have earned if they had a real job
-high-rate burglars (193) earn about as much as what they would have made if they had a
real job
o50,000$ per year
-profits are reduced by the costs of a criminal career: bail bonds, legal fees, loss of family
income, psychological cost of prison sentence
oat the end of the year, crime makes very little money
-criminals overestimate the money they can earn
o12x higher than actual amount
-some criminals believe that thyey have to commit crime because no other work is available
o2/3 of inmates reported being employed before going to jail
-criminals are more likely to be underemployed than unemployed
-criminals believe that they will eventually be caught
o7% of burglaries result in arrest, only 25% of those prosecuted are sent to jail
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