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Study Guide

AFM280 Study Guide - Fall 2019, Comprehensive Final Exam Notes - Organizational Commitment, Job Performance, Canada


Department
Accounting & Financial Management
Course Code
AFM280
Professor
Christopher Holt
Study Guide
Final

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AFM280

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Organizational behaviour: field of study devoted to understanding, explaining, and ultimately improving
the attitudes and behaviours of individuals and groups in organizations
Human resources management takes the theories and principles studied in OB and explores the “nuts
and bolts” applications of those principles in organizations. An OB study might explore the relationship
between learning and job performance, whereas a human resources management study might examine
the best ways to structure training programs to promote employee learning
Strategic management focuses on the product choices and industry characteristics that affect an
organization’s profitability
The theories and concepts found in OB are actually drawn from a wide variety of disciplines. For
example, research on job performance and individual characteristics draws primarily on studies in
industrial and organizational psychology. Research on satisfaction, emotions, and team processes draws
heavily on social psychology. Sociology research is vital to research on team characteristics and
organizational structure, and anthropology research helps inform the study of organizational culture.
Finally, models from economics are used to understand motivation, learning, and decision making
Role of Management Theory
A major influence on the way people viewed and
thought about OB was the work of Frederick Taylor,
the father of scientific management. As an engineer,
Taylor was focused on designing optimal and efficient
work processes
An Integrative Model of OB
To clarify such issues, this textbook is structured
around an integrative model of OB that is designed to
provide a road map for the field of organizational
behaviour.
Individual Outcomes
The rightmost portion of the model contains the two
primary outcomes of interest to organizational
behaviour researchers (and employees and managers):job performance and organizational
commitment. Most employees have two primary goals for their working lives: to perform their jobs well
and to remain members of an organization they respect
Individual Characteristics and Mechanisms
In Chapter 4 we focus on several key personal characteristics—personality, cultural values,and ability—
and describe their relationships to performance and commitment. Then we look at a number of
important individual mechanisms: job satisfaction, how employees feel about their jobs and day-to-day
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work (Chapter 5); stress, employees’ psychological responses to job demands that tax or exceed their
capacities (Chapter 6); motivation, the energetic forces that drive employees’ work effort (Chapter 7);
trust, justice, and ethics, how strongly employees feel their company conducts business with fairness,
honesty, and integrity (Chapter 8); and learning and decision making, the ways employees gain job
knowledge and use it to make accurate judgments
Relationship Mechanism
Chapter 11 describes team characteristics and processes, exploring the structure of effective work
groups, such as their norms and their roles, and describing the processes at work in the behaviour of
groups and teams, such as cooperation, conflict, and managing diversity. Chapter 12, on power,
influence, and negotiation, examines how people leverage their relationships to attain authority and
achieve desirable outcomes within organizational settings. In Chapter 13 we describe how leaders relate
to their followers, focusing on how different leadership styles and behaviours impact the attitudes and
actions of others at work.
Organizational Mechanism
Every company, for example, has an organizational structure that dictates how the units within the
firm link to (and coordinate with) other units (Chapter 14). Sometimes structures are centralized
around a decision-making authority; sometimes structures are decentralized, affording each unit some
autonomy. Chapter 15 examines organizational culture and change. Every company has, within it,
shared about the rules, norms, and values that shape employee attitudes and behaviours; from time to
time, these organizational cultures have to change, and we review this process
Conceptual argument
This perspective describes what exactly makes resources valuable—that is, what makes them capable of
creating long-term profits.
A firm’s resources include not only financial (e.g., revenue, equity) and physical (e.g., buildings,
machines, technology) ones, but also ones related to
organizational behaviour, such as the knowledge, ability,
and wisdom of the workforce and the image, culture, and
goodwill of the organization.
The resource-based view suggests that the value of
resources depends on several factors, shown in The
resource-based view also suggests that a resource is more
valuable when it is inimitable, meaning it cannot be easily
copied
Concept of numerous small decisions
The concept of numerous small decisions captures the
idea that people make
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