Study Guides (248,497)
Canada (121,596)
Chemistry (166)
CHEM 120L (23)
Final

CHEM 120L Study Notes.doc
Premium

6 Pages
373 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Chemistry
Course
CHEM 120L
Professor
Sue Stathopulos
Semester
Fall

Description
SAFETY General WHMIS beforehand – no messing around on anything, no food/drink anywhere PPE – goggles, coat, feet Treatment  Skin Chem: emergency shower – TA/HS Eye Chem: eye wash – 10 mins. TA/HS Fire Emergency kill switch for gas, electricity and water – leave and set the alarm Stop drop and roll Apparati should be clear of any controls or switches, keep vapours to minimum/take need st Extinguishers – on the wall inside each 1  year lab Class A ­ ordinary combustibles (paper, wood, plastics) Class B – flammable liquids (gas, oil, etc.) Class C – electrical equipment (wiring, outlets, appliances) PASS – Pull pin, Aim low, Squeeze handle, Sweep slowly and across base Chemicals MSDS – know BP, flashing point, VPressure, toxicity, incompatibilites, explosive limits Danger Vapours – in the fume hood Waft when necessary – use rubber bulb with pipette  Don’t take excess – dispose in bucket allocated Clean up mercury immediately, don’t use unlabeled, neutralize A or B,  Glass  Names of glassware – know them, don’t use broken or chipped, sweep up broken Erlenmeyer or thin­walled/flat bottom flasks are not safe with vacuum, carry all vertically Place rollable glassware at 90 degree to edge of surface Clean everything before you use it (emptied and rinsed and dried) Syringes or propipettes used for corrosive or toxic materials EXPERIMENT ONE   Need to Know • Know the reaction equations, which reactions occur (ex. by heating, etc.) and physical descriptions/color of tings o Ex. CuO (s) (black solid) + H2SO4 (aq) + H2O ­­> Cu(SO)4 (aq) (blue solution) + H2O • Know how to calculate percent yield (i.e. CuSO4 was obtained from the reaction of CuO with sulfuric acid.  If 2.5 g of  CuSO4 was obtained from 5.0 g of CuO, what is the percent yield?)   Purpose • To observe the chemical properties of copper through a series of reactions • To recover the original mass of solid copper by synthesizing different copper compounds   Theory  • Many organic and inorganic compounds are synthesized by the chemical industry even though they can be found in nature,  because a limited natural supply or expensive extraction process may make synthesis more economical • Things we have to take into consideration when synthesizing: o Availability of equipment, Percentage yield, Value of by­products   • This experiment illustrates the synthesis of several copper compounds from metallic copper: o Cu ­> Cu(NO3)2 ­> Cu(OH)2 ­> CuO ­> CuSO4­­5H2O ­> Cu • We expect to get the same mass of copper at the end than what we started with…in order to do so, we must prevent loss by: o Avoiding spattering while boiling o Not leaving product on the sides of beakers o Not spilling the product o Purifying precipitates by washing efficiently then drying completely before weighing  Procedure • Part 1: Synthesis of Copper(II) Nitrate and Copper(II) Hydroxide o Cu + 4HNO3 ­> Cu(NO3)2 + 2NO2 + 2H2O  It is OXIDATION/REDUCTION REACTION  We carry this out in the fume hood and swirl the reaction mixture to remove any brown gases  trapped in the solution o Cu(NO3)2 + 2NaOH ­> Cu(OH)2 + 2NaNO3   It is DOUBLE DISPLACEMENT REACTION  The solution should be basic (alkaline) after the addition  Cu(OH)2, the product, is a BLUE gelatinous precipitate Part 2: Synthesis of Copper(II) Oxide o Cu(OH)2 –Δ­> CuO + H2O   It is BY HEATING  It is a DECOMPOSITION REACTION  Convert to CuO b/c is LESS GELATINOUS precipitate than Cu(OH)2; thus, easier to isolate  The BLUE Cu(OH)2 becomes BLACK CuO  If heating doesn't do the trick we add MORE NaOH o Filtration • Filter with a suction filter flask and a Buchner funnel • Wash CuO with water both to get it out of the beaker and because it is wet with a solution which contains  NaNO3 and NaOH, and we want to get rid of it • Part 3: Synthesis of Copper(II) Sulfate o CuO + H2SO4 –Δ­> CuSO4 + H2O  It is BY HEATING  It is an ACID­BASE (Metal Oxide) REACTION  As the CuSO 4forms, it dissolves into Cu + 4O , and the Cu ion gets hydrated to become  Cu(H O) 2+ 2 4  The BLACK CuO will dissolve into a BLUE solution • Part 4: Synthesis of Copper o CuSO4 + Zn ­> ZnSO4 + Cu  It is SINGLE DISPLACEMENT REACTION  Zinc is more chemically active than copper and displaces copper(II) ions from solutions, meaning  that it is better at combining with SO4 than Cu is  The solid visible consists of unreacted zinc metal and copper metal (the product)  The BLUE solution will turn WHITE/CLEAR o Zn + 2HCl ­> ZnCl2 + H2  It is SINGLE DISPLACEMENT REACTION  The purpose of this is to remove excess zinc metal from the previous reaction  Know reaction is over when no more bubbles ­ that is the formation of H2 happening  Questions to Understand BUMPING – liquid bursts from rapid boiling or too much liquid QUANTITATIVE TRANSFER – everything is completely transferred – no traces left behind DECANT – gradually pour out supernatant solution overtop solid residue without fucking up sediment ­ For finding volume of 20% w/w NaOH – used density, and m/MW then multiplied resultant mass by 5 ­ There was also nitrate in part 1 that prevent immediate precipitation Percent Recovery > 100% – not enough to dry, too little time to dry Percent Recovery  stronger ones  o We cover the flask with foil but prick a hole to allow gas to escape o When we heat the liquid, it will evaporate and gas will escape from the flask until there is only so much inside that  the pressure inside the flask EQUALS the atmospheric pressure  o Once we reach this point, we can use the PV=nRT equation because: • We know P: it is the atmospheric pressure of the lab • We know V: it is the volume of the flask (up to the rim – not the denomination) • We know R: it is a constant • We know T: temperature inside the flask will be equal to the temperature of the water bath  o Thus we can calculate the molar mass of gas by weighing beaker and subtracting initial set­up weight Procedure • Set up the Erlenmeyer flask with the volatile liquid inside • Boil the water bath and put the flask in at angle to tell when the liquid has evaporated! o Water will be lost to evaporation – we compensated with more  o If any water gets into the flask, it's game over…we must re­start the experiment (think about why) • As soon as all the liquid has disappeared, continue heating for 1 more minute and then remove the flask • Let it sit for 15­20 minutes so that all vapor and condense back into liquid form – weigh and calculate!   Questions to Understand o How do you find percent error? (Exp ­ Theo / Theo x 100) o Why above room temperature and below boiling point of water? Spontaneously boil and will never reach boil o What was in after the methanol added and covered? Methanol (l/g) and air (g) o What was in before flask removed from hot water? Methanol (g) o What was in after cooling? Methanol (l/g) and air (g) o MOLAR MASS TOO HIGH – if experimenter cools but no dry o MOLAR MASS UNAFFECTED – if not all vapour condenses inside flask o MOLAR MASS TOO HIGH – if assume volume is denominations o MOLAR MASS TOO HIGH – if experimenter has dirty fingers Experiment 3 – Acid­Base Titrations: Identification of an Unknown Solid Acid   Need to Know • Be able to perform simple stoichiometric calculations (like the pre­lab questions) • Know how to do the calculations in the standardization of a NaOH solution with oxalic acid • Know how to calculate the molecular weight of an unknown acid • Know what the different terms used in the manual concerning titrations and standardized solutions mean (primary and  secondary standards, mono­, di­, and tri­protic acids, weak vs. strong acids and bases) • Know the weak and strong acids and bases listed in Table 1   Theory • The fundamental process occurring in an acid­base reaction is the transfer of a proton (H+) from the acid to the base • Bronsted and Lowry’s definitions: • An acid is a substance that can donate protons/A base is a substance that can accept a proton • Neutralization is a proton transfer from acid t
More Less

Related notes for CHEM 120L

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit