Study Guides (248,410)
Canada (121,516)
Commerce  (94)
COMM 101 (53)
Midterm

midterm_note.docx

6 Pages
55 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Commerce 
Course
COMM 101
Professor
Roopa Reddy
Semester
Winter

Description
Benefit of business plan ­help you with the process of planning ­explain what the new venture is trying to accomplish and how it will go about attaining these goals. ­more impressive and persuasive  ­planning for clearer understanding of the best ways of proceeding. Model of business planning 1. Prepare a relatively simple business plan; this can be used to obtain initial funding if it is needed. 2. Actually start the business. 3. Refine the business plan on the basis of experience gained from running the business and use the revised plan to run  the business and secure additional funding as necessary. 4. Continue to grow the business  Characteristics of well prepared plan ­be arranged and prepared in proper business form ­be succinct ­be persuasive  Critical risks ­price cutting by competitors who refuse to roll over and play dead for the new venture ­unforeseen industry trends that make the new venture’s product or service less desirable ­sales projections that are not achieved for a variety of reasons thus reduce cash flow ­design, manufacturing, or shipping costs that exceed estimates. The Art of the Start – providing the guideline for anyone starting anything. 1. Make meaning ­  2. Make mantra – forget long, boring, and irrelevant mission statement 3. Get going – build something. Don’t focus on pitching, writing, and planning. 4. Define a business model – you have to figure out a way to make money. 5. Weave a MAT (milestone, assumptions, tasks) – compile a list for each of these to keep you on track when all hell  breaks loose. Why write the business plan? ­makes the team consider issues it glossed over in the euphoria ­uncovers holes in the founding team ­forces the founding team to work together ­due­diligence stage of courting an investor Milestones ­formal incorporation of the new venture, completion of product or service design, completion of prototypes, hiring of initial  persons, product display at trade shows, reaching agreements with distributors and suppliers, launch of initial production, receipt  of initial orders, first sales and deliveries, profitability Seven deadly sins ­The plan is far too slick ­The plan is poorly prepared; looks unprofessional ­No clear statement of the qualifications of the management team. ­Financial projections are wildly and unreasonably optimistic. ­It is not clear why anyone would want to buy the product or service ­It is not clear where the product is with respect to production ­The executive summary is too long and does not get to the point. 4 principles of business writing ­purposeful: you will be writing to solve problems and convey information. You will have a definite purpose to fulfill in each  message. ­persuasive: you want your audience to believe and accept your message. ­economical: you will try to present ideas clearly but concisely. Length is not rewarded. ­audience oriented: you will concentrate on looking at a problem from the perspective of the audience instead of seeing it from  your own. 3x3 writing process 1. Prewriting  Analyze: decide on your purpose such as channel.  Anticipate: profile the audience. Indirect method for negative or persuasive messages. (prediction)  Adapt: try to think of the right words and the right tone that will win approval. 2. Writing  Research: gather data to provide facts.  Organize: group similar facts together.  Compose: prepare a first draft, usually writing quickly. 3. Revising  Revise: edit your message to be sure it is clear, conversational, concise, and readable.  Proofread: take the time to read over every message carefully.  Evaluate: decide whether this message will achieve your purpose. Made to stick ­sticky message? Understandable, memorable, and effective to changing thought or behaviour Simplicity – find and communicate the core of the message (simple) Unexpectedness – surprising and interesting, open gaps in knowledge and fill it. Concreteness – make ideas clear and distinguish it Credibility – make them believe, external credibility (authority, experts, celebrity), internal credibility (vivid details, statistics,  testable credential) Emotion – get people to care, appeal to self­interest, identity, make them feel something Stories – simulation, inspiration, spotting a story Emotional Intelligence (written by Daniel Goleman) ­the ability to perceive emotional information and use it to guide thought and actions ­focused on self­awareness, social awareness, self­management, social skills ­connection between emotional intelligence and leadership skills and perspectives 1. participative management: getting buy­in from colleagues at the beginning of an initiative by involving them, engaging them  through listening and communicating, influencing them in the decision­making process and building consensus. 2. putting people at ease:  3. self­awareness 4. balance between personal life and work 5. straightforwardness and composure 6. building and mending relationships 7. doing whatever it takes 8. decisiveness 9. confronting problem employees 10. change management  ­Between two of these career threatening flaws and certain aspects of emotional intelligence 1. problems with interpersonal relationships 2. difficulty changing or adapting. IQ vs EI vs personality IQ does not and cannot predict the success in life, person’s ability to learn, understand, and apply information and skills in a  meaningful way (understanding information)  EI is understanding emotion. It measures how a person recognizes emotions themselves and manages it for better work and team  play.  Personality is same EI, but EI is more efficient for workplace, and personality is just context. Uses for EI in business 1. Ability to remain calm under pressure 2. Ability to resolve conflict effectively  Successful hiring, reduced training cost, higher levels of productivity and success, greater individual performance,  better leader and managers DISC Dominant, direct, decisive (active, task) – fear of being taken advantage of Influencing, interactive, interested in people (active, people) – fear of rejection Stable, steady, secure (people, passive) – fear of loss of se
More Less

Related notes for COMM 101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit