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Final

UFOR 100 Final: FINAL

12 pages65 viewsWinter 2019

Department
Urban Forestry
Course Code
UFOR 100
Professor
Lorien Nesbitt
Study Guide
Final

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FINAL
1.Explain why conflict management is important in urban forestry
• Conflict management instead of resolution
• Role of mediator or facilitator or arbitrator
• Drawing up ground rules
• Starting from agreement
• Building up trust
2. What is meant with the 'Rules of the game' in urban forest governance
• Formal procedures of design making and implementation
• Informal rules and "routines" of interaction
3. Define 'governance' and apply it to an urban forestry context
- • Efforts to direct human action towards common goals, and more formally as
the setting, application and enforcement of generally agreed to rules
Putting in a new type of street tree, making sure the community agrees on it/
government does too.
4. The key dimensions of urban forest governance
• Context: forests & trees; human population
• Institutional framework: policies; planning and regulations; ownership; access
and use rights
• Actors and coalitions: primary stakeholders; other stakeholders; partnerships;
power analysis
• Resources: funding; knowledge and information; delivery mechanisms
• Processes: discourses; participation, engagement and conflict management;
monitoring and evaluations
5. what is meant with 'discourses' in urban forest governance - and provide examples
of major current discourses
Discourse-talking about important things, e.g. canopy cover, public health,
"rewilding"
6. What is meant with 'Actors and Alliances' in urban forest governance
Actors and coalitions:
primary stakeholders
other stakeholders
partnerships
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power analysis
7. List the main actors groups in urban forest governance
Government (at different levels)
• Organizations such as churches and school boards
• Communities
• NGOs and interest groups
• Businesses, including consultants
• Academia
Residences
8. Provide examples of the different resources actors can use in urban forest
governance
Power
• Knowledge and information
• Networks and connections
• Money
• Leadership
• Land ownership and/or tenure rights
9. Understand how urban forest governance is implemented - and differs - across the
globe
MELBOURNE
Actors:
• Political commitment
• Very strong municipal team
Resources:
• Importance of good and visual information
• Competence and leadership
• International inspiration
Rules of the game
• Formal and informal processes
Discourses
• Focus on climate change adaptation
ST PETERSBURG
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Actors:
• Distrust between administration and public too large
• Administration disbelieved PP would be beneficial
• No real counterpart to Danish NGO
Resources:
• Role of power and trust
Rules of the game
• Some success in enhancing dialogue between partners
• Some important key questions not asked
• Danish tools: not suitable for Russian context (?)
Discourses
• High ambition level, but public participation failed
10. Explain what is meant with 'cultural ecosystem services'
The nonmaterial benefits people obtain from ecosystems through spiritual
enrichment, cognitive development, reflection, recreation, and aesthetic
experiences
11. Describe different categories and examples of cultural ecosystem services
provided by urban forests
Astetic= how it looks, effects it has on person in park
Spiritual= many religious cultures rely heavy on nature.
Educational= how it can teach current and future generations about importance of
forest + self reflection
Recreational = go play soccer.
12. Understand the principles of green infrastructure planning
Planning content
• Network / connectivity
• Multifunctionality
• Grey-green integration
• Multi-scale
Planning process
• Strategic
• Inter- and transdisciplinary
• Socially inclusive
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