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Final

GDS 100 Final: GDS100 Final Notes
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4 Pages
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Fall 2015

Department
Global Development Studies
Course Code
GDS 100
Professor
Cherrie Enns
Study Guide
Final

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1.1
When people think of a ‘developing country’, they automatically think of countries that
need to be turned into what we are accustomed to seeing in North America, or a more
westernized country. Development does not necessarily mean modernization; the definition of
development to me means working on the priorities that a specific country wants met; instead of
trying to change a country’s culture or norms, we should build upon them to strengthen them. In
section 1.6 Jennifer A. Elliot states that a developing country should feel “empowered to shape
their own developmental priorities”. I agree with that completely; we should not force others to
bend to our norms just for aid because we have the power to do so as a more developed country.
Patricia Northover in section 1.7 believes that people differ in the ability to translate resources
into proper functionings. One individual may see a resource differently than another. When we
take the time to pay proper attention to what others offer, and what they are capable of as an
individual and a country as a whole, it helps to “distinguish between the unfreedom and
deprivation of a starving child and the liberty of a fasting monk” (section 1.7). Development
does not automatically means modernization and making a developing country into a sort of
‘mini North America’ is not what development is supposed to be working towards. Instead it
should be looking at what the countries bring to the table and what needs work, and then
assisting those countries in order to achieve something great. Just because we hold the power in
our hands and have the ability to assist a developing country, it does not give us the right to
change a country’s cultures and norms because we please to. We should instead strengthen and
enrich the culture which is what I believe development is all about.
The road to development has not been an easy one to say the least, and there is still a lot
as a global community we could and can do. There are many different perspectives when it
comes to critiquing the road to development, with so many different theories, statistics and
information coming in from every available source. Christiane Loper’s article demonstrates that
the post-development till now has started to build a “rich academic foothold”. In the article, I
took away from it that we should not view the human rights as limitations, but opportunities that
with the help of the human rights, will make the development agenda successful. In the article, it
also rejects the concept of universalism; which I do not agree with. In my opinion, we do not
need to be all the same. It is better to have different cultures and ways of thinking, as more brains
is better than one when thinking of a solution to a problem or issue. The TED Talks speaker
stated his opinion that ‘the world is going backwards’, but for me I do not necessarily think so.
We have made so many advances in many different fields that has helped people across the
world. With the 2030 Development Goals targeting many different issues all at once, it is
important to consider and question the affects the goals will have on the gap between the rich
and poor in certain areas of the world. The post-development goals have the potential to raise the
standard of living across the world; but how easily will people in better living standards let go of
controlling the economics, power and their way of doing certain things for the ‘greater good of
the world’? At the end of the article we had to read, Lopers writes, “post-development means the
destruction of so-called truths as well as the encouragement of engagement…”. By keeping an
open mind we can come up with new ideas and ways of succeeding. We need to as a global
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Description
1.1 When people think of a ‘developing country’, they automatically think of countries that need to be turned into what we are accustomed to seeing in North America, or a more westernized country. Development does not necessarily mean modernization; the definition of development to me means working on the priorities that a specific country wants met; instead of trying to change a country’s culture or norms, we should build upon them to strengthen them. In section 1.6 Jennifer A. Elliot states that a developing country should feel “empowered to shape their own developmental priorities”. I agree with that completely; we should not force others to bend to our norms just for aid because we have the power to do so as a more developed country. Patricia Northover in section 1.7 believes that people differ in the ability to translate resources into proper functionings. One individual may see a resource differently than another. When we take the time to pay proper attention to what others offer, and what they are capable of as an individual and a country as a whole, it helps to “distinguish between the unfreedom and deprivation of a starving child and the liberty of a fasting monk” (section 1.7). Development does not automatically means modernization and making a developing country into a sort of ‘mini North America’ is not what development is supposed to be working towards. Instead it should be looking at what the countries bring to the table and what needs work, and then assisting those countries in order to achieve something great. Just because we hold the power in our hands and have the ability to assist a developing country, it does not give us the right to change a country’s cultures and norms because we please to. We should instead strengthen and enrich the culture which is what I believe development is all about. The road to development has not been an easy one to say the least, and there is still a lot as a global community we could and can do. There are many different perspectives when it comes to critiquing the road to development, with so many different theories, statistics and information coming in from every available source. Christiane Loper’s article demonstrates that the post-development till now has started to build a “rich academic foothold”. In the article, I took away from it that we should not view the human rights as limitations, but opportunities that with the help of the human rights, will make the development agenda successful. In the article, it also rejects the concept of universalism; which I do not agree with. In my opinion, we do not need to be all the same. It is better to have different cultures and ways of thinking, as more brains is better than one when thinking of a solution to a problem or issue. The TED Talks speaker stated his opinion that ‘the world is going backwards’, but for me I do not necessarily think so. We have made so many advances in many different fields that has helped people across the world. With the 2030 Development Goals targeting many different issues all at once, it is important to consider and question the affects the goals will have on the gap between the rich and poor in certain areas of the world. The post-development goals have the potential to raise the standard of living across the world; but how easily will people in better living standards let go of controlling the economics, power and their way of doing certain things for the ‘greater good of the world’? At the end of the article we had to read, Lopers writes, “post-development means the destruction of so-called truths as well as the encouragement of engagement…”. By keeping an open mind we can come up with new ideas and ways of succeeding. We need to as a global community look at improving the lives of today as well as future generations instead of getting caught up in the race for money. With the 2030 Development Goals positive change is possible. Development means changing an environment socially, politically, and economically in a positive way. By raising the food, medical service, and education levels, and creating conditions where people feel safe and secure, development occurs. By feeling secure, people are in an environment that supports and creates a safe environment for them to thrive. For many people, the word development has one concrete definition but after reading the text and finishing this course, in my opinion that is not the case. The definition of development has changed and evolved a lot over the years, and it will continue to change as the world modernizes and evolves along with it. 1.2 In such a culturally diverse world, it is often hard to collectively agree as to what exactly needs to be done to improve present and future conditions, but the world leaders came together on September 27 at the United Nations headquarters in New York and formed the 17 Sustainable Development Goals which is a positive step in the direction of change. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), are a “universal invitation” to collaborate, partner, and work together to move towards a better world. The 17 goals, building off of the previous Millennium Goals were established to achieve three extraordinary things in the next 15 years: end extreme poverty, fight inequality and injustice, and fix climate change. The SDGs are an attempt to envision what the standard of living enjoyed by everyone around the world should be by 2030. In my opinion the SDGs are an extreme Utopian way of thinking about the future if all the goals were accomplished. The SDGs are a “collective global vision” of what a good quality of life people and the planet should look and function like, but without implementation nothing can be achieved. It is one thing to create these goals, and another to actually follow through and make progress towards achieving them. A country’s willingness will be the deciding factor as to how well the goals can and will be achieved by the 2030 deadline. National interests around the world can vary; that being said one particular goal may be the main concern for one country, while for another country that same goal may not even be a particular concern to it. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development presentation held at UFV on Oct. 13th gave me as well as many others in the community an insight into a number of different initiatives underway at UFV by various disciplines that coincide with the SDGs. The entire event was a success, as it brought together the community to understand what exactly the goals were about and when implemented Jan. 1st of the new year just how we can think of doing our part in achieving them by 2030. Collectively coming together and understanding the impact of the goals is just as important as implementing them. Everyone around the world needs to know; without the knowledge of the goals forming I don’t think anyone would benefit from them. Goal 4 quality education, comes into mind when on the topic of knowledge. We cannot fight for our rights if we do not know what they are. Knowledg
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