Study Guides (248,269)
Canada (121,449)
CMN2101 (25)
Final

CMN 2101 Exam Review .docx

12 Pages
303 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Communication
Course
CMN2101
Professor
Rumaisa Shaukat
Semester
Fall

Description
CMN 2101: Exam Review  Dec 11th 2012  Research Methods in Communication Eid Muhammad  Chap 6­ 13 excluding 9 and 12 Chapter 6­Qualitative and Quantitative Research:  Triangulation theory requires using multiple theoretical perspectives to plan a study or interpret the data.  Triangulation of method mixes the qualitative and quantitative research approaches and data.  Linear and nonlinear paths: Linear­ fixed sequence of steps Non linear research path­ requires us to make successive passes through the steps.  Reconstructed logic: a logic of research based on reorganizing, standardizing and codifying research  knowledge and practices into explicit rules formal procedure  Logic in practice: a logic of research based on an apprenticeship model and the sharing of implicit  knowledge about practical concerns and specific experiences; it is characteristic of qualitative research.  Universe­ the entire category or class of units that is covered or explained by a relationship or hypothesis.  Bricolage: improvisation by drawing on diverse materials that are lying about and using them in creative  ways to accomplish a pragmatic task.  First order interpretation: interpretations from the point of view of the people being studied. Second­order interpretation: qualitative interpretations from the point of view of the researcher who  conducted a study.  Third order interpretation: qualitative interpretations’ made by the readers of a research report.  Variable: a concept or its empirical measure that can take on multiple values.  Attributes: the categories or levels of a variable.  Independent variable: a type of variable that produces an effect or results on a dependent variable in a  casual hypothesis. Dependent variable: the effect or result variable that is caused by an independent variable in casual  hypothesis. Intervening variable: a variable that comes logically or temporally after the independent variable and before  the dependent variable and through which their causal relation operates.  Causal hypothesis: a statement of a causal explanation or proposition that has at least one independent  and one dependent variable and has yet to be empirically tested.  Null hypothesis: a hypothesis stating that there is no significant effect of an independent variable on a  dependent variable. Alternative hypothesis: a hypothesis paired with the null hypothesis that says an independent variable has a  significant effect on the defendant variable Double barreled hypothesis: a confusing and poorly designed hypothesis with 2 independent variables in  which it is under whether one or the other variable or both in combination produce an effect:  Logic of disconforming hypothesis: the logic for the no hypothesis based on the idea that confirming  empirical evidence makes a weak case for the existence of relationship; instead of gathering supporting  evidence, testing that no relationship exists provides more cautious, indirect support for its possible  existence. Tautology: an error in explanation in which the causal factor independent variable and the result deep in the  variable are actually the same or restatements of one another, making apparent causal relationship true by  definition. Teleology: an error in explanation in which the causal relationship is empirically untestable because the  causal factor does not come earlier in time than the result or because the causal factors vague, general  force that cannot be empirically measured. Ecological fallacy: and Aaron explanation in which empirical data about associations found among large­ scale units of analysis are greatly overgeneralize and treated as evidence for statements about  relationships among much smaller units.  Spuriousness: an apparent calls a relationship that is illusionary due to the fact of an unseen are initially  hidden causal factor; the unseen factor has a causal impact on both an independent and dependent  variable and produces a false oppression that a relationship between them exists. Summary:  Tautology: the relationship is true by definition involves circular reasoning. Example­poverty is caused by  having very little money. Teleology: the cause is an intention that is inappropriate, or is misplaced temporal order. Ex: people get  married in religious ceremonies because society wants them to. Ecological fallacy: the empirical observations are at too high a level for the calls a relationship that is  stated.Ex: New York has a high crime rate. Joan lives in New York. Therefore, she probably stole my watch. Reductionism: the empirical observations are at too low­level for the cause relationship that is stated. Ex:  because Stephen lost his job and did not buy a new car, the country entered a long economic recession. Spuriousness: an unseen 3rd variable is the actual cause of both the independent and dependent variable.  Ex: hair length is associated with TV programs. People with short hair prefer watching football; people with  long hair prefer romance stories.(Unseen: Gender)  Conceptualization: the process of developing clear, rigorous, systematic conceptual definitions for abstract  ideas/concepts. Conceptual definition: the careful, systematic definition of a construct that is explicitly written down. Operationalization: the process of moving from a construct conceptual definition to specific activities are  measures that allow researchers to observe it empirically. Operational definition: a variable in terms of specific actions to measure or indicate it in the empirical world. Rules of correspondence: standards that researchers use to connect abstract constructs with measurement  operations in empirical social reality. Conceptual hypothesis: a type of hypothesis that expresses rebels and the relationship among them in  abstract conceptual terms. Empirical hypothesis: a type of hypothesis in which the researcher expresses variables the specific  empirical terms of expresses the Association among measured indicators in observable, empirical terms. Casing: developing cases in qualitative research. Measurement reliability: dependability or consistency of the measure of a variable. Stability reliability: measurement reliability across time, a measure that yields consistent results at different  time points assuming what is being measured does not change itself. Representative reliability: measurement reliability across groups; a measure that yields consistent results  for various social groups. Equivalence reliability: measurement reliability across indicators; the measurement yields consistent results  using different specific indicators, assuming that all measure the same concept. Multiple indicators: the use of multiple procedures or several specific measures to provide empirical  evidence of the levels of a variable. Face validity: the type of measurement validity in which an indicator makes sense as a measure of the  construct in the judgment of others, especially in the scientific community. Content validity: a type of measurement validity that requires that a measure represent all aspects of the  conceptual definition of a construct. Criterion validity: measurement validity that relies on some dependent, outside verification. Concurrent validity: measurement validity that relies on a pre­existing authority accepted measured to verify  the indicator of construct. predictive validity: measurement validity that relies on the occurrence of the future vendor behavior that is  logically consistent to verify the indicator of a construct. Construct validity: a type of measurement validity that uses multiple indicators and has 2 subtypes: how  well the indicators of one construct converter how well the indicators of different constructs diverge. Convergent validity: a type of measurement validity for multiple indicators based on the idea that indicators  of one construct will act like or converge. Discriminant validity type of measurement validity for multiple indicators based on the idea that indicators a  different constructs diverge. Levels of measurement: a system for organizing information in the measurement of variables into 4 levels  from nominal level to racial level. Continuous variables: variables are measured on a continuum in which an infinite number of finer  gradations between variable attributes are possible. Discrete variables: variables in which the attributes can be measured with only a limited number of distinct,  separate categories. Nominal level measurement: the lowest, least precise level of measurement for which there is a difference  in type only among the categories of a variable.  Ordinal level measurement: a level of measurement identifies a difference among categories of a variable  and allows the categories to be rank ordered as well. Interval level measurement: a level of measurement identifies differences among variable attributes, ranks  categories, and measures distance between categories but has no true 0. Ratio level measurement: the highest, most precise level of measurement; variable attributes can be rank  ordered, the distance between them processing measured, and there is absolute 0. Mutually exclusive attributes: the principle that variable attributes or categories in the measure or organize  so that responses fit into one category and there is no overlap. Exhaustive attributes: the principle that attributes are categories to measure that should provide a category  for all possible responses. Unidimensionality: the principle that when using multiple indicators to measure a construct, all indicators  should consistently fit together and indicate a single construct. Index: disarming or combining of many separate measures of the concept for variable to create a single  score. Standardization: procedures to adjust measures statistics lead to permanent making an honest comparison  by giving a common basis to measures of different units.  Scale: a class of quantitative data measures often meet uses survey research that captures the intensity,  direction, level or potency of the variable construct along a continuum; most are at the ordinal level of  measurement. Likert scale: a skill often used in survey research which people express attitudes or other responses in  terms of ordinal level categories (ex: agree or disagree) that are ranked along the continuum. Response set: a tendency to agree with every question in a series rather than carefully thinking through  one’s answer to each.  Thurstone scaling: measuring in which the researcher gives a group of judges many items and asks them to  sort the items into categories along a continuum and then considers the sorting results to select items on  which the judges agree.  Bogardus social distance scale: a scale measuring the social distance between two or more social groups  by having members of one group indicate the limit of their comfort with various types of social interaction or  closeness with members of the other group(s).  Semantic differential: a scale that indirectly measures feelings or thoughts by presenting people a topic or  object and a list of polar opposite adjectives or adverbs and then having them indicate fe
More Less

Related notes for CMN2101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit