Study Guides (247,988)
Canada (121,207)
ENV1101 (24)
Midterm

Environmental studies Mid-Term Exam Notes

8 Pages
388 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Environmental Studies
Course
ENV1101
Professor
Sonia Wesche
Semester
Fall

Description
Environmental studies NOTES CHAPTER 1 Definitions Environment: is more that water , land and air. It’s the sum total of our surroundings. It includes  earths biotic and abiotic components which we interact with  Biotic: Animals, plants, forests soils & people Abiotic: Continents, clouds, rivers, icecaps International relations, politics , ethics, business management, economics, social equity,  engineering, Law enforcement ALL play a role in protecting and managing the environment. Environmental Science:  The study of how the natural world works, how our environment affects us,  and how we affect our environment. Environmentalism: A social movement dedicated to protecting the natural world, an by extention,  Humans­ from undesirable changed brought about by human choices. Natural resources are vital to our survival.. there are limits to many of our renewable resources. Renewable Natural Resources: ­ Sunlight ­ Wind / wave/ Geothermal Energy Non­Renewable Natural Resources: ­ Crude oil ­ Natural Gas ­ Coal ­ Copper, Aluminum & other metals The IN­BETWEEN ­ Agricultural crops ­ Fresh water ­ Forest products ­ soils Environmental impact Formula ▯ I=P x A x T  (Population, Affluence, Technology) Affluence is “level of consumption” Carrying Capacity: measure of the ability of a system to support life Ecological Footprint: Tool that can be used to express the environmental impact of an individual or  population. Calculated in terms of land, water required to provide the raw materials that person or  populations comsumes, and to absorb or recycle the wastes produced. Bio­capacity: the capacity of extra terrestrial or aquatic system to be biologically productive and  absorb waste, especially carbon dioxide *** When population exceeds or overshoots the carrying capacity or bio­capacity of a system, the  system will be at risk of permanent damage. Sustainability: A guiding principle in environmental science that requires us to live in such a way as  to maintain earths systems and natural resources for the foreseeable future. Chapter 3 Our planets environments consists of complex systems and networks. Including webs of  relationships among species and interatcions of living species with non living entities.  Each system  also include cycles that shape the landscapes around us. System= a network of relationships among parts, elements, or components that interact with and  influence one another through the exchange of energy, matter or information. OPEN SYSTEMS ­ Systems that receive inputs of both energy and matter and produce outputs of  both.  Energy and matter are freely exchanged with surroundings CLOSED SYSTEMS ­Systems that receive inputs and produce outputs of energy but not matter.   Matter cycles among the various parts of the system but does not leave or enter the system.  Energy is free to come and go. Feedback Loops: Relationships between parts of a system. Positive Feedback: Reinforces or speeds up a change that is occurring Negative feedback: Counteracts of slows down a change that is occurring Geosphere: rock and sediment beneath our feet  Atmostphere: composed of air surrounding our planet Hydrosphere: all water­ salt, liquid, fresh, ice, vapour Biosphere: all the planets living and recently deceased and decaying organisms Biotic­  Anything that has to do with life or living organisms Abiotic­  Non­ living parts of the environment. Continents, clouds, rivers, icecaps Water, minerals, light oxygen, temperature, wind Organic Matter: Material from which living things or formerly living things is made. Usually includes Hydrogen atoms and may include Nitrogen, Oxygen, Sulpher or Phosphorous There are 6 key elements used to create organic matter (living things): Carbon (C) - essential Hydrogen_ _(_H_)_ _ Oxygen _(_O_)_ _ Nitrogen ( N_)_ _ Phosphorous_(_P_)_ _ Sulpher_(_S_)_ _ Inorganic Matter:  Compounds of mineral( rather than biological origin) Biomes: Large regions of similar biotic communities Habitat: Physical ad biological or abiotic and biotic conditions which a species is adapted Landscape: Group of interacting ecosystems Ecological Niche’s – Some species are  Specialists: meaning they have very specific requirements, so only found in certain conditions EX:  Koala Bear Generalists: have a broad tolerance to different conditions and can survive a range of habitats EX:  Raccoon Ecosystems­ A distinctive Biotic Community and the abiotic systems with which it interacts.****  definition consists of all organisms living and non­living entities that occur and interact in a particular area at  the same time. Biological community ( group of interacting organisms of various types interacting  and living together in a specific habitat. 4 Main Ecosystems= Grassland, Aquatic, Forest, Desert Ecotones: Areas where ecosystems meet often  Autotrophs like green plants use photosynthesis to capture the suns energy and produce food. The  result of this process is the production of BIOMASS, organic material of which living organisms are  formed Gross primary production (GPP): the conversion of energy to the energy of chemical bonds in  sugars by autotrophs Net primary Production (NPP):  The energy that remains after respiration and is used to generate  biomass. BioGeoChemical Cycles: Hydrologic or (water cycle)­ Sumarizes how water­in liquid, gaseous and solid forms flow thr
More Less

Related notes for ENV1101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit