Study Guides (380,000)
CA (150,000)
UOttawa (10,000)
ITA (20)
Ricci (10)
Final

ITA1113 Final: How the theme of Francis Bacon’s Paintings are Central to Last Tango.docx


Department
Italian Language and Culture
Course Code
ITA 1113
Professor
Ricci
Study Guide
Final

This preview shows page 1. to view the full 5 pages of the document.
How the theme of Francis Bacon’s Paintings are Central to Last Tango
12/09/2014
The film's opening credits include two paintings by Francis Bacon: Double Portrait ofLucian
Freud and Frank Auerbach and Study for a Portrait. The hues used in the film were inspired by
the paintings of Bacon.[7] During pre-production, Bertolucci frequently visited an exhibit of Bacon's paintings
at the Grand Palais in Paris; he said that the light and colour in Bacon's paintings reminded him of Paris in
the winter, when
"the lights of the stores are on, and there is a very beautiful contrast between the leaden gray of the wintry
sky and the warmth of the show windows...the light in the paintings was the major source of inspiration for
the style we were looking for."[8]
Bacon's painting style often depicted human skin like raw meat and the painter's inspiration included meat
hanging in a butcher shops window and human skin diseases.[8]
Cinematographer Vittorio Storaro had previously worked with Bertolucci on The Conformist and often
used an azure hue in the film. Storaro later told a reporter that
"after The Conformist I had a moment of crisis; I was asking myself: what can come after azure?...I did
not have the slightest idea that an orange film could be born. We needed another kind of emotion...It was
the case of Last Tango.[8]
For Last Tango in Paris, Bertolucci and Storaro took inspiration from Bacon's paintings by using "rich
oranges, light and cool grays, icy whites, and occasional reds combine[d] with Bertolucci's own tasteful
choices of soft browns, blond browns, and delicate whites with bluish and pink shadings."[9]
Bertolucci took Marlon Brando to the Bacon exhibit and told Brando that he "wanted him to compare himself
with Bacon's human figures because I felt that, like them, Marlon's face and body were characterized by a
strange and infernal plasticity. I wanted Paul to be like the figures that obsessively return in Bacon: faces
eaten by something coming from the inside."[8]
Tonetti, Claretta. Bernardo Bertolucci : The Cinema of Ambiguity. New York : London: Twayne ;
Prentice Hall International. Print. Twayne's Filmmakers Ser.
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

12/09/2014
"the lights of the stores are on, and there is a very beautiful contrast between the leaden gray of the wintry
sky and the warmth of the show windows...the light in the paintings was the major source of inspiration for
the style we were looking for." [8]
Bacon's painting style often depicted human skin like raw meat and the painter's inspiration included meat
hanging in a butcher shops window and human skin diseases.[8]
Cinematographer Vittorio Storaro had previously worked with Bertolucci on The Conformist and often
used an azure hue in the film. Storaro later told a reporter that
"after The Conformist I had a moment of crisis; I was asking myself: what can come after azure?...I did
not have the slightest idea that an orange film could be born. We needed another kind of emotion...It was
the case of Last Tango.[8]
"wanted him to compare himself with Bacon's human figures because I felt that, like them, Marlon's face
and body were characterized by a strange and infernal plasticity. I wanted Paul to be like the figures that
obsessively return in Bacon: faces eaten by something coming from the inside." [8]
During pre-production, Bertolucci frequently visited an exhibit of Bacon's paintings at the Grand Palais in
Paris;
http://www.camft.org/ScriptContent/Professional_Ex/Articles/DepressedBody.htm
“You’re not alone, Paul. I’m here.
Jeanne  Jean  John, anonymous lover of a prostitute
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version