Study Guides (247,982)
Canada (121,201)
Philosophy (546)
PHI1370 (23)
Final

PHI1370 Final Exam Review.doc

7 Pages
398 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHI1370
Professor
Ken Ferguson
Semester
Winter

Description
PHI1370 Final Exam Review Study Questions for Part A (16 points) 1) What is meant by presumed consent, punish/reward and conscription in the context  of procuring human organs for transplants? • Presumed Consent:   it is assumed that people wish to donate, unless they sign a form  explicitly indicating otherwise. The rationale behind this is that many people would  not go to the trouble of denying permission to use their organs, so many more organs  would become available  • Punish/reward:    •This idea has different versions •Organ donors given priority as organ recipients  •Non­organ donors go to bottom of waiting lists for organs •Non­organ donors are not eligible for organ transplant  •This idea would be hard to administer, and it calls into question the ethics of  punishing and rewarding patients  • Conscription:  upon death all usable organs of deceased become property of the state,  and so would be available for transplantation­ consent would be neither required nor  requested •This would save thousands of live and be less costly but would violate the  autonomy of the decedent  2) What ethical problems are raised by what is called transplant tourism? • Transplant tourism:  traveling to a foreign country for a transplant because of the  shortage of organ donors and long wait times in host country  •Ethical issues of transplant tourism •Is it fair for the recipient to receive free medical care upon their return when they  illegally obtained organs  •Donors are usually a marginalized group, often poor and illiterate. Many donors  lost their jobs after donation because they could no longer lift heavy objects  •Health conditions for donors are often very poor (unsanitary conditions, lack of  post operative care) 3) Explain the difference between physician­assisted suicide, passive voluntary  euthanasia and active voluntary euthanasia? • Euthanasia:  a person(X)  intentionally kills or permits the death of another person (Y)  for their own benefit (Y) • Passive voluntary euthanasia:   the subject is competent and requests their own death,  and a person (X) intentionally allows another person (Y) to die for their own  benefit (Y) • Active voluntary euthanasia:   the subject is competent and requests their own death,  and a person (X) intentionally kills another person (Y) for their (Y) own benefit  • Physician –assisted suicide:  a physician intentionally helps a patient (Y) to commit  suicide  4) Why is passive voluntary euthanasia legal in Canada but not active voluntary  euthanasia? •Define passive voluntary euthanasia and active voluntary euthanasia  •The general view is that active euthanasia is killing and killing is wrong. While  passive euthanasia is merely letting someone die  5) How is James Rachels’ Smith/Jones example in reading 29 supposed to be relevant to  the morality of active voluntary euthanasia? •Example from reading: Smith and Jones are both monitoring their 6 year old cousin  (the death of this child would mean gain for both men). Smith drowns his cousin in the  bath whereas Jones observes his cousin hit his head and fall face down in the water  and drown but does nothing to save him •This example points to the distinction between killing and letting die and underlines  that it is a mere legalistic hair­splitting. Rachels’ objection holds that the distinction  between killing letting die is not morally relevant­ the only difference between the two  acts is that one is killing and the other is letting die but morally they are equally bad  6) Describe two major considerations that count in favour of legalizing active voluntary  euthanasia in Canada. (Don’t evaluate them.) •Would reduce suffering  •Killing a patient is sometimes quicker and less painful than letting the patient die  (and may also allow for a more dignified death •For example: ALS patients cannot speak, swallow walk, move without assistance,  and some would say if a person is afflicted with this are they suffering more by  living?  •Would increase autonomy •Being serious and true to maximizing autonomy, if death if what a competent  person wants then society should permit active euthanasia  •Some would claim that people have a human right to euthanasia  7) Describe how randomized clinical trials work. •The objective of an RCT is to test the effectiveness of an intervention  •Patients are randomly divided into two groups • Experimental group:   receives an intervention • Control group:  group that is given a placebo or best current treatment  •Types of blind trials • Single blind:  patients don’t know which group they are in but their doctors do • Double blind:  neither the patients nor their docotrs know which group they are in  •Phases of RCTs • Phase I  tested on small group to see if the drug or treatment of safe, the maximum  dosage is determined  • Phase II  tested on a larger group (100­300) who have the illness  • Phase III  tests on a larger group (1000­3000) with a control group to compare the  effectiveness  • Phase IV:  further resting to gather additional information about effectiveness  •If at the end of the trial the rate of improvement in the experimental group is  significantly greater than for the control group then there is evidence that the new  therapy is more effective in treating the illness •The evidentiary strength increases as the number of participants increase and the  longer the trial endures  8) Explain why the Hellmans in Reading 38 believe that randomized clinical trials  sometimes raise a serious ethical problem for physicians. •Randomized trials often place physicians in the ethically intolerable position of  choosing between the good of the patient and the good of the society. We urge that  such situations be avoided and that other techniques of acquiring clinical information  9) Explain clearly the doctrine known as “clinical equipoise”. •This doctrine holds that there is genuine uncertainty within the expert medical  community (not just necessarily on the part of the individual investigator) as to which  of alternative treatments is more effective  •If it is to be acceptable to conduct a trial, there must be uncertainty as between the  effectiveness of different treatment  •If a physician merely has a hunch that one treatment is better there is no obligation to  inform the patient. The obligation is only to inform the patient if the medical  community has a preferred treatment 10)Briefly describe two theories of justice. •Justice is an important principle in the context of allocating scarce resources • Theories described will be based on distributive justice (how benefits and burdens  should be distributed if the distribution is to be just and fair) • The desert theory:  a distribution is only just if each person gets what he/he deserves.  Some criteria of desert include talent, effort, contribution, danger, difficulty, need  •It is argues that determining how much different people will receive can be  arbitrary and unfair  • The Utilitarian theory:  a distribution of benefits and burdens is just if and only if it  maximizes overall happiness  •Different ways of dividing things up may produce different amounts of happiness  (i.e. dividing up ice cream cones on a soccer team vs. distributing organs among  patients)  11)Describe the “Worst first, first come, and hopeless second” rule for deciding which  patients should see the doctor first in the triage case, reading 44. •This rule holds that those with the most serious injuries are treated first, but after this  it’s first come first served. There is an exception for those who cannot be saved to treat  them after those who can be saved  •Basically the rule is first come, first served with two exceptions: more seriously  injured go in first and the hopeless cases go in last  12)What is the Sympathy Rule in the triage case, reading 44? •This rule begins with the impartiality rule which is that HCP should usually be  impartial in helping patients. However the rules must be appropriate for people with  ordinary human sympathies and feelings (i.e. biases toward friends or relatives) •The sympathy rule would NOT permit HCP to help their relative/friends in any way  they like. It would permit them to give priority to their relative only in very extreme,  life and death situations  •This rule is okay in society’s POV because society values both impartiality and close  ties between relative and friends. The sympathy rule os a compromise between the two  •Therefore in the case of reading 44 it was oaky for Alice to send her aunt in first  13)What is meant by the term ‘alternative medicine’? (Try to be as precise as you can.) • Alternative medicine:  remedies, treatments or practices used for medical purposes but  not recognized or accepted as effective by medical establishment (also called folk  medicine, complementary medicine). This does not necessarily mean non­Western  medicine  •Emphasizes a holistic approach to health including importance of natural substance (as  opposed to man­made drugs of modern medicine). It often also involves a spiritual or 
More Less

Related notes for PHI1370

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit