Study Guides (248,161)
Canada (121,353)
Psychology (1,235)
PSY2105 (71)
Midterm

4. CHILD DEVELOPMENT MIDTERM 1.doc

27 Pages
316 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY2105
Professor
David Collins
Semester
Fall

Description
CHILD DEVELOPMENT MIDTERM 1  CHAPTER ONE – BACKGROUND AND THEORIES Developmental psych is concerned with changes in abilities and behavior across the lifespan.  GOALS:  Description: identify behavior at certain points Explanation: determine causes of change Materialism o Thomas Hobbes o Soul is meaningless o Nothing exists but matter and energy o Conscious thought is produced by the brain Empiricism o John Locke o All knowledge derives from sensory experience  o Ideas not innately present o Thought is a reflection of one’s experience EARLY THEORISTS John Locke o Children gain experience/learning  o “Tabula Rasa” – mind starts as a blank slate at birth & behaviors are learned Jean­Jacques Rousseau o Argued children are born with innate knowledge that drives development (Nativism)  Johann Gottried Von Herder o Specifics of culture are crucial to understanding development (cultural relativism)  Charles Darwin o Natural Selection o Gave rise to recapitulation (congruence in form suggests embryos are repeating evolutionary stages of ancestors.) PIONEERS OF CHILD PSYCHOLOGY G. Stanley Hall o Father of child psychology o Founded field of developmental psychology James Mark Baldwin o First Canadian academic psychologist to study development John B Watson o Observable behavior Arnold Gesell o Maturational processes o Produced age related norms for development Sigmund Freud o Early childhood experiences o 5 stage theory of psychosexual development (libido­ innate sexual energy) o Stimulation of erogenous zones = pleasure o  Stages :  1. Oral 2. Anal 3. Phallic 4. Latent 5. Genital  o Inappropriate childhood experiences cause a child to be stuck at a stage and will manifest in adult behaviors. o Phallic stage gives rise to Oedipus complex, repression and identification.  o Interactionist perspective – Nature and Nurture (first to suggest)  Erik Erikson o Eight stage psychosocial model o Birth – 1.5  Trust vs. Mistrust o 1.5 – 3  Autonomy vs. Shame o 3 – 6  Initiative vs. Guilt o 6 – 12  industry vs. inferiority o 12 – 18  identity vs. role confusion o Young Adult  intimacy vs. isolation o Adult  Generativity vs. Stagnation o Older Adult  Ego integrity vs. despair ISSUES IN DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCH NATURE V. NURTURE – biology vs. environment CONTINUITY V. DISCONTINUITY – smooth vs. staged development NORMATIVE V. IDIOGRAPHIC – universal vs. individual difference THEORIES OF DEVELOPMENT Cognitive Developmental Approach o Piaget (biologist) o Schemes: cognitive structures used to understand o Development is reorganization of knowledge into complex schemes o  Two functions guide CDA:   1. Organization (merge ideas – old and new)  2. Adaptation (to survive most fit with the environment)  o  Promoted by:   1. Assimilation (make sense of new info using existing schemes) 2. Accommodation (changing schemes to fit with new info)  4 Stages: 1. Sensorimotor: Birth to Two.  Simple Reflexes and knowledge through interactions 2. Preoperational: Two to Six Begins to use symbols to express and represent world cognitively.  3. Concrete Operations: Six to Eleven Mental operations and logical problem solving 4. Formal Operations: Twelve to Adulthood Formal problem solving and abstract thinking Cognition formed of three parts: 1. Sensory input 2. Info processing 3. Behavioral output Sociocultural Approach o Vygotsky (Marxist)  socialism and collectivism o Cognitive development is a result of cultural influences o Tools of intellectual adaptation – problem solving/thinking o Learn problem solving through dialectical process (talking to people) o Brofenbrenner  o  5 systems:  micro, meso, exo, macro and chrono.  Environmental Approach o Experiences interact with biological processes to produce development o Does not invoke unseen cognitive processes, focuses heavily on learning o Learning: relatively permanent change in behavior that results from practice or experience. Reflected in observable behavior  and not due to biological maturation.  o BF Skinner.  o  Two forms of learning:   1. Respondent: environment brings certain responses 2. Operant: impact of behaviors on the environment. o  Types of learning:   1. Habituation: decline of response after time 2. Classical Conditioning: stimulus & response 3. Operant Learning: reinforcers & punishers CC vs. Operant CC – learn relations between different stimuli and responses Operant – Relations between stimuli and one’s own behavior Social Learning Theory o Bandura o Added observation to environmental theory o Children imitate their models o Reciprocal determinism: interaction between person’s characteristics and behavior with the environment.  Model Of Observational Learning Reciprocal Determinism Evolutionary Approach o Ethology - evolutionary significance of an animal's behaviors in its natural environment. Broadly speaking, ethology focuses on behavior processes across species rather than focusing on the behaviors of one animal group. o Two determinents of behavior  1. Immediate: environment or internal 2. Evolutionary: evolutionary advantage o Innate behaviors are: 1. Universal 2. Require no learning 3. Are stereotyped (similar form) 4. Minimally affected by environment o Imprinting: emotional bonds formed by young members to their mothers. o Applications of ethological theory:  1. Bowlby’s observations showed attachment is crucial to survival of the young.  2. Sociobiology: examines genetic effects on social behavior.  3. Evolutionary developmental psych: characteristics are a result of adaptational challenges. 4. Natural Selection.   CHAPTER TWO – RESEARCH METHODS A theory is a set of statements describing the relation between behavior and the factors that influence it.  A hypothesis is a statement that proposes a relation.  ROLE OF THEORIES: 1. Organize research findings 2. Guide new research Objectivity: Investigations must be repeatable with very similar results! No bias! HOW TO ENSURE OBJECTIVITY: 1. Focus only on observable behavior  2. Must be measureable (beginning to end.) 3. Everything must be quantifiable (counted) DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH Naturalistic Observation o Observed in real life settings o Direct source of info in natural setting o Presence of observers may influence o Setting is not the same for all so it’s hard to compare Structural Observation o In a structured lab experiment o Controlled – behaviors of interest occur o Can produce generalizability – not valid in real life Interview o Verbal reports via questions/questionnaire o Provides valuable info o Concerns about what interviewer wants to hear  Case Study o Descriptive study of a single individual o Studies are specific and personal o Findings can’t be generalized to all CORRELATIONAL RESEARCH Correlational Study o How variables are related o Make predictions about relationships o Cannot prove causality EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH Experiment o Manipulates independent variable and look for changes o Allows for assessing of variables / causation  o Not always ethical to manipulate desired variable o May not be generalizable  Quasi­experimental o Groups that differ on a characteristic are compared o Cannot be experimentally manipulated o No causation Longitudinal Study o Same group examined at various points in time o Study as children age o Study stability of traits and effect of various experiences o Attrition, repeated testing and time consuming Cross­sectional Study o Different ages compared at same time o Quick and no attrition o Cohort effects may influence Cross­sequential Study o Cross sectional + longitudinal o Time consuming and costly Microgenetic Study o Examine small group as development is expected to occur o Repeated testing can influence results Cultural Study o Cross cultural studies – designed to determine influence of culture on development o Interviews, observations, reports, labs o Test universality of a phenomenon  o Parenting, reasoning, morals, memory, etc.  ETHICAL ISSUES Potential risks:  o Physical injury o Psychological harm o Negative emotions o Violations of privacy PRINCIPLES OF ETHICS 1. Non­harmful procedures 2. Informed consent 3. Parental consent 4. Additional consent – teachers, guardians etc.  5. Incentives – be fair and not exceed normal range 6. Deception – inform before/after study 7. Anonymity 8. Mutual responsibilities: clear agreement 9. Jeopardy – no jeopardizing well being of child 10. Unforeseen consequences – act accordingly 11. Confidentiality 12. Informing participants – misconceptions of study 13. Reporting results – careful of wording 14. Implications of findings – careful in presentation and implications CHAPTER THREE – BIOLOGICAL CONTEXT OF DEVELOPMENT Chromosomes: chemical strands in cell nucleus that certain genes. Each nucleus has 46. One comes from the mother and one from the  father.  Autosomes: 22 of the pairs (other than sex chromosomes.) If the chromosome pair is:  XX – Female XY – Male Mitosis – Body Cells Meiosis – Germ Cells DNA – Deoxyribonucleic Acid : 4 Bases Adenine  Cytosine & & Thymine Guanine   Crossing over: During meiosis, the x­shaped chromosomes line up and intermix, yielding a novel genetic product Alleles ­ genes for the same trait located in the same place on a pair of chromosomes o alternate forms of gene pairs o homozygous ­ same two o heterozygous ­ different genes make up pair TYPES OF GENES Structural: guide production of proteins Regulator: control activities of structural genes Principle of dominance: alleles of a trait are not equal and one usually dominates.  Dominant gene (Brown eyes / freckles / colour vision) Recessive gene (blue eyes / baldness / blond hair) Principle of segregation: each inheritable trait is passed to offspring separately.  Principle of independent assortment:  traits are passed on independent of each other (ex: hair vs. eye colour)  Polygenic inheritance: a trait that is determined by a number of genes (ex: intelligence) Incomplete dominance:  nor dominant nor recessive … each shows a little bit.  Codominance: both alleles are dominant and completely expressed.  Genomic imprinting: one allele is biochemically silences and other parent’s allele affects phenotype of offspring.  Mutations (genetic variations) can be adaptive or maladaptive o  Dominant disorder   o Huntington’s chorea: a fatal syndrome in which the nervous system degenerates in adulthood (age 30­40) –  can’t control movements (jerky) and dementia/cognitive degeneration. Dominant disorder. Symptoms may not  show up until someone starts reproducing. That is why it stays in the gene pool.  o  Recessive disorder    Diseases with errors of metabolism  Tay­Sachs disease: a fatal disease in which the nervous system disintegrates because the body cannot break  down fats in brain cells o  Recessive disorder   o Diseases with errors of metabolism  Phenylketonuria (PKU): an inherited disease in which the body cannot process the amino acid phenylalanine • amino acid in high­protein foods  homozygous gene for synthesizing a faulty enzyme   causes severe brain damage  routinely screened for at birth  tr
More Less

Related notes for PSY2105

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit