Study Guides (248,217)
Canada (121,408)
Psychology (1,235)
PSY2106 (21)

PSY 2106 Notes Term 2.docx

14 Pages
169 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY2106
Professor
Heather Poole
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 6  10/09/2013 Standard scores: scores with a mean of 0 and a standard deviation of 1  Standardization: the process of computing standard scores  Percentile: the point below which a specified percentage of observations fall  T scores: a set of scores with a mean of 50 and std dev of 10  When we know the size of a population, we can determine how many raw scores fall above or below a  given score when we convert it into Z scores  Standard deviation measures the average variability—how much, on average, do people vary around the  mean?  Chapter 8  10/09/2013 8.1 Sampling distribution: the distribution of the means of various samples from the population  Sampling error: variability of a statistic from sample to sample due to chance  8.3­6 Sample statistics: Statistics calculated from a sample and used primarily to describe a sample  Test statistics: the results of a statistical test  Decision making: a procedure for making logical decisions on the basis of sample data  Rejection level: also called significance level, it is the probability with which we can reject the null  hypothesis  Rejection region: the set of outcomes of an experiment that will lead to the rejection of the null  hypothesis  Hypothesis Testing  5% is the cut­off for what is typical of a population Top or bottom 5%, or split depending on the test, is considered a statistically significant difference  If someone is in the 96  percentile, they are considered part of their own population, not in the same  th th population as everyone from the 0 ­95   Chance variation: results due to no particular factor—individual differences. This is measured by  standard deviations  This is equivalent to noise in the data set  Systematic variation: How much the independent variable affected the dependent variable  Equivalent to signal in the data set  Chapter 8  10/09/2013 Systematic Variation due to confounds: Some other variable other than IV that affects the DV  We always want signal > noise  Are the results bigger, or more different than we would expect to see by chance?  It is definitely not significant if it falls between one standard deviation from the mean  Population distribution: Distirbution of individual’s scores  Can use this to find frequency and standard deviation and mean  Each point corresponds to one individual’s score  Sampling distribution: distribution of the means of a group of samples of the same size from a  population.  Each point corresponds to one group’s mean  Find average for multiple samples  Can identify standard error and mean of the means  Standard deviation shows, on average, how far individual scores fall from the mean  Standard Error shows how far, on average, sample means fall from the mean  The mean of a population distribution should equal the mean of a sampling distribution if they are from the  same population  As sample size increases, width/variance decreases  When you add more people to each group you take away some of the effect outliers have  If the mean of a sample is not similar to the mean of the sampling distribution, it is not a good  representation of the population.  If the sample mean would be highly rare in the given population, we can assume that it is part of a different  population. Especially when we are dealing with sample means rather than individual means  The point of hypothesis testing is to figure out whether a sample belongs to the population or not  We make two types of hypotheses and try to disprove the null  Null hypothesis: the hypothesis that our findings are not part of a new population, but are part of the  old one  Chapter 8  10/09/2013 Is proven if there is no statistical significance between the sample and the mean of the null population  We try to disprove this rather than prove the alternative because to prove something you have to show that  there are no exceptions. However, all we need to do to disprove the null is show that there is at least one  exception.  Alternative hypothesis: our findings are part of a new population and the difference is statistically  significant between our sample and the null population  The notation p 
More Less

Related notes for PSY2106

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit